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Drinking to a healthy life with stainless raincatchers

As many cities and towns across Australia continue to experience water restrictions due to the drought, seeking solutions to water saving is now a high priority with consumers.

Raincatcher - a unique design that separates the atmospheric and roof pollutants from the water.In 1994, ASSDA member, Hart to Hart Fabrications developed the Raincatcher - a unique design that separates the atmospheric and roof pollutants from the water.

The Raincatcher tank is manufactured from grade 304 stainless steel. Even parts like pins, hinges and filter screens are all made from stainless steel material.

Rainwater from the roof runs through the leaf diverter, removing leaves and large debris. The rainwater then flows through a unique filtration system, diverting atmospheric and roof pollutants away from the main water storage facility.

Raincatcher's main storage facility and filtration system is made from stainless steel due to its high resistance to corrosion, staining and bacteria.

The most frequent concern about drinking water is its bacteriological quality. Research has shown that there is about 100 times less bacteria residue on stainless steel than on other materials.

Raincatcher tanks are a useful solution to the health conscious water consumers, and also to people who live in areas which have particular problems with tap water.  It can be used in combination with existing rural water tanks.

Raincatcher can be used as an additional unit to an existing water tank. The water stored in Raincatcher has passed through the filtration system, making it excellent for drinking and kitchen use.

Raincatcher is an affordable alternative to tap water filtration units, and perhaps in the long term, to bottled spring and mineral water.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005.

Designing kitchens of style with Bell Stainless

Great attention to detail is what immediately comes to mind when you visit the home and kitchen of Kenmore Hills property developer, Matt Sproule.

Sproule's residence in Brisbane's westside features a modern stainless steel kitchen designed by Brian Grant Kitchens and Bathrooms that would be the envy of most interior designers and home chefs.

According to Sproule, friend and business associate, Royce Amos of Royce Amos Interior Design was the driving force for the inclusion of stainless steel benches in the design.

Fabricated by ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Bell Stainless, the large prestige kitchen has four food preparation areas all designed for entertaining a large group of people.

The main area of the kitchen design features a five metre long stainless steel benchtop with a highly, scratch resistant textured finish and seamless welded Murray triple bowl sinks (another full size sink is under the drainage tray).

Other kitchen areas include a stainless steel barbeque with hood and in-built drain for oils and grease plus textured stainless side benching, stovetop gas burners, hood and textured stainless bench and a four metre long marble island bench for food preparation.

Bell Stainless' craftmanship and attention to detail is highlighted in the enduring finish. Sproule said that he was delighted with the way Bell Stainless handled the job. After one year in service and with careful treatment by its owners, the stainless steel benches show no sign of scratches or dents.

Bell Stainless is a family-owned business operating since 1956, mainly manufacturing for the domestic market, an area not often tackled by many metal fabricators.

Bell Stainless is the only Australian company and ASSDA Accredited Fabricator to have won an international award for kitchen design and manufacture from the South African Stainless Steel Development Association.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 35, Autumn 2006.

crimsafe security: stainless steel that's tough on crime

Small business owner Peter Burr is really serious about protecting property at his automotive engineering business in Brisbane. 

Using his engineering background, Peter Burr beat the burglars with ASSDA member, Crimsafe's Commercial System product with unique screw-clamp design. 

“We got it because I saw a number of the businesses around us get broken into,” Peter says. “In fact just before I started looking for a stainless security mesh the businesses in the industrial park where we are located were broken into five times in just eight months”.

“The usual method of entry was a heavy bit of concrete or rock straight through the plate glass. With nobody around at night, the thieves could make that kind of noise and get away with it - it was a real smash and grab affair.”

“We didn't want to put bars on the shop front, because we didn't want our business to carry that jail-like aspect. So I started looking at a couple of security meshes.”

Featuring more than five times the number of screws through the mesh than those used in domestic Crimsafe, Crimsafe's Commercial Grade security system is virtually indestructible.

Screws are drilled into the clamp every 25mm in a staggered fashion to resist any tendency for a single line of screws to weaken the mesh under extreme pressure.                   

In engineering a high level of security to prevent break-ins and theft, the Commercial Crimsafe product even withstood a ballistic missile test under simulated cyclone conditions.

With that kind of security, Peter can go home at night and have peace of mind that his business and property will be safe.

“It wasn't the cheapest security screen, but it was the only one we saw that we could have had any faith in. So we had it installed and in the three years since we've never had a problem with theft.”

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005.

Creating consumer appeal with Koolall and stainless steel

Food retail shops and bars are constantly vying for the attention of consumers. Presentation is everything and stainless steel appeal can often be an essential ingredient to business success.

LENARD'S POULTRY SHOP

 

One such Australian business success is Lenard's Poultry. Lenard's was voted the Best Food Retailer in Australia by the National Retail Association at the 2005 Rewards for Excellence.

With more than 194 stores throughout Australia and more planned to open in the next financial year, Lenard's went head-to-head with some heavy-weight competitors including supermarkets, takeaway food and fresh food retailers to secure the prestigious title.

According to ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Koolall Manufacturing, creating consumer appeal requires working closely with business franchisees and shopowners to ensure a quality presentation and functional design.

Established in 1979, current owner Igor Theodoridis purchased the company in 1986. Situated between Brisbane and the Gold Coast, Koolall Manufacturing specialises in the design and manufacture of custom stainless steel commercial kitchens and refrigeration cabinets.

Mr Theodoridis says often franchisee owners must “run to a deadline that's set by shopping centres” to ensure that all shops open simultaneously and on schedule.

With more than 17 years experience working with franchisees for Lenard's and the Coffee Club, Koolall's personal approach to handling fitouts for commercial kitchens and hotels is an enviable achievement.

THE COFFEE CLUB

Koolall Manufacturing offers uncomplicated, full service fitouts that effectively streamlines the shopfitting process leaving clients like The Coffee Club free to focus on the business - not the fitout.

Since the opening of the first Coffee Club franchise in 1989, Koolall Manufacturing's team work hard to ensure that the Coffee Club brand and culture is consistently achieved.

The company designs, manufactures and installs fridges, cake displays and kitchen preparation benching and equipment for more than 105 Coffee Club outlets in Australia and New Zealand.

GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL

A major refit of one of Brisbane's great railway bars, Fihelly's Arms Hotel, has seen the city venue transform into the Grand Central Hotel.

Koolall Manufacturing designed, manufactured and installed the stainless steel refrigeration units and benching for the main public bar, commercial kitchen and Platform - a bar for trainspotters and travellers looking for a tipple.

And with a hotel that offers about 20 beers on tap, Koolall's design assistance was critical in positioning beer fonts, glass racks and benches for staff to operate as efficiently as possible.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005

Choosing hot water storage tanks

Replacing your hot water system is both inconvenient and expensive, so it pays to carefully consider a hot water storage tank that will stand the test of time as well as deliver energy (and cost) efficiencies.

Storage tanks for hot water systems are made from either stainless steel or from carbon steel with a coating of vitreous enamel.

Stainless steel hot water storage tanks

A hot water storage tank made from grade 316 stainless steel. Image courtesy of Edwards Hot Water.Stainless steel tanks are made from 316 stainless steel, a material which is typically used in the marine industry because of its high corrosion resistance. The 316 stainless steel provides a natural barrier to corrosion that is virtually maintenance free.

This characteristic of stainless steel is evident by the use of 316 or its sister alloy 304 in many other areas of the home including kitchen sinks, dishwashers, washing machines, pots, pans, cutlery and fridges.

The material's strength and inherent corrosion resistance as well as its fatigue resistance from the stresses of constant temperature and pressure variation during service makes stainless steel a strong and durable option.

Vitreous enamel hot water storage tanks

Because carbon steels will corrode in contact with air or water, the surface of the tank must be protected by a layer of vitreous enamel added to line the interior of carbon steel.

However, manufacturers can't make the enamel layer perfectly impervious. The steel and enamel lining expand and contract at different rates as the temperature in the tank rises and falls. This can cause the enamel to craze or come unstuck from the steel, exposing it to water and corrosion. This is a particular problem if the water temperature is set too high.

The steel exposed at the coating defects is protected by the use of a 'sacrificial anode' that acts to prolong the life of the tank. These anodes, usually made from a magnesium alloy, require checking at regular intervals and replacement every 5-7 years on average.

Some water qualities (such as very soft or very pure water) are inappropriate for this system because characteristics of the water render the anode ineffective.

Stainless steel storage tank manufacturers

Edwards Hot Water, Aquamax and Beasley Water Systems are some of the main stainless steel storage tank manufacturers in Australia.

ASSDA member, Edwards Hot Water, has over 35 years of experience in the manufacture, supply and installation of stainless steel hot water systems. Edwards Hot Water exports tanks to 40 countries and the tanks comply with AS2712, the benchmark standard for hot water systems.

Manufacturers of stainless steel hot water tanks give long warranties because in the majority of conditions the tanks perform excellently and provide years of trouble free service without the need for regular maintenance or consumable parts.

Choosing a stainless steel hot water system means long life, low maintenance and a long warranty.

Image courtesy of Edwards Hot Water.
This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Building sustainably with stainless steel termimesh

Residential developers are encouraging new homebuyers to adopt more environmentally friendly materials when building - a trend that is growing in strength throughout many Australian capital cities and regional towns.

Termimesh works just like an insect screen. The mesh barrier is expertly installed across concealed potential termite entry points during the early stages of construction.The Old Broome Estate's Sustainable Home Award is offering $20,000 cash as a first prize incentive to a homeowner/builder who can best meet the sustainable design guidelines.

One sustainable element specified in the guidelines included using a non-toxic white ant deterrent such as Termimesh, a stainless mesh barrier manufactured by ASSDA member, TMA Corporation (formerly Termimesh Australia).

Termites nest in the ground underneath homes and if left unchecked can make a meal of timber floorboards and supporting frames. When a house has been identified as infested, immediate disruptive and expensive repairs, spraying and annual checks are required.

Termite damage is not commonly covered by normal household insurance, so land owners planning on building a new house should be proactive in specifying safe and effective termite protection.

The Termimesh System is produced from a proprietary, specialised grade of stainless steel that provides a highly effective and long life protective barrier against termites without the spraying of chemicals.

Termimesh works just like an insect screen. The mesh barrier is expertly installed across concealed potential termite entry points during the early stages of construction.

Termimesh is included in the Australian Standard - Protection of Buildings from Subterranean Termites, and has been assessed through the CSIRO product appraisal system.

With the backing of a 10 year warranty, many leading home builders throughout Australia include the Termimesh System as their standard specification for termite control. In addition, the Australian developed System has been exported overseas to South East Asia, Japan and the United States.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 36, Winter 2006.

Australian design wins international award

An Australian firm has won the kitchen design category of the prestigious Stainless Steel Awards conducted by the South African Stainless Steel Development Association.

Competing against entrants from all over the world, Queensland fabricator Bell Stainless won with its Crerar design, which was judged to be the most attractive and functional domestic kitchen installed during the past two years. The competition criteria were that the kitchen had to be designed using stainless steel appliances, kitchen accessories as well as stainless steel wash-up equipment, such as sinks and preparation bowls.

The objective of the Awards program is to encourage creativity, competitiveness and productivity in the stainless steel industry. Awards are made in fourteen categories covering all aspects of stainless steel design and manufacturing. Bell Stainless also achieved finalist status in the welding category.

Other 2002 finalists and winners came from South Africa, Finland, India, France and Canada.

Bell Stainless manufactures and installs both domestic and commercial kitchens, specialising in custom design and manufacture for clients' specific needs, including benchtops, rangehoods, custom designed furniture, water features and balustrading.

Bell Stainless has spent years refining designs and manufacturing techniques. Its winning design utilises stainless steel in several applications.

The rangehood and bench surfaces are made from 5WL Rimex textured stainless steel with curved mirror finished bullnose edging, providing both scratch resistance and visual interest. Other features have been constructed from stainless steel tube, round and flat bar in different finishes as well as satin finish sheet.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 23, December 2002.

A Step Up in Stainless Design

When a Melbourne design company decided to expand their business to a neighbouring space, a challenge was set: the adjoining office was on an upper level and a walkway was needed to connect the two.

The challenge was met by Carr Interior’s Daniel Stellini who envisioned a simple, strong and aesthetically refined stainless steel “hanging” staircase to allow for transit between the floor levels. 

“Considering the portal represents such a high traffic area, we required a material that was durable, strong and low maintenance: stainless steel met our brief on all three counts,” he said.

“It was our intent to express the raw edge detail of the 3mm stainless steel highlighting its fine yet strong characteristics,” Mr Stellini said.

ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Hi-Tech Stainless Fabrications used 620 kilograms of grade 304 stainless steel to construct the skeleton of the stairwell off-site. Due to the confined 900mm working space the pieces were assembled, TIG welded, screwed on from the inside and polished on-site.

Upon arrival at reception, the portal is seen as a crisp, polished insertion to the building’s brickwork, representing a refined sculptural element against the raw, distressed solid wall. Its fixing to only the upper level of the tenancy allows it to project and hover over the lower floor, whilst maintaining a weight capacity of 340 kilograms.

The stair’s profile has been left exposed, making it a feature of the space. Mr Stellini said challenging the conventional use of materials such as stainless steel is something he continues to do. Not a bad idea when you look at the possibilities!

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 44 - Spring 2008.

Train travel in stainless style

Benefits in the areas of cost, appearance and durability were the key factors in the NSW State Rail Authority's decision to specify stainless steel for the construction of a fleet of new passenger trains to be delivered over the next five years.

United Goninan, a leading designer and manufacturer of railway rolling stock based in Newcastle, has been chosen to design and manufacture 161 double deck electric multiple unit (EMU) passenger cars over three stages.

Stage 1, to be completed in 2006, comprises 41 cars, with 80 to be delivered the following year and a further 40 cars the year after. The total value of the contract comes to $450 million.

The new rail car builds on the knowledge United Goninan has amassed using stainless steel in over 800 cars to date. It combines the maintenance advantages and modern styling of its previous flagship model, Tangara, with new crashworthiness requirements.

Tangara has been acknowledged as a worldclass doubledeck electric multiple unit. When it was designed for the same client in the mid-80s, the 450 car contract was the largest ever let in Australia for rolling stock. The minimal maintenance requirements experienced during the service life of these vehicles have been due to durability of stainless steel.

The new cars will be deployed in Sydney and on outer suburban routes in Wyong and Penrith. They will be built according to new crashworthiness requirements which involve specialised construction techniques with stainless steel to create 'crumple zones' to maximise safety in the event of a head-on collision.

Each car body structure will utilise over 11 tonnes of grade 301LT/ST/MT stainless steel sheet, in thicknesses varying between 0.8 and 5mm depending on the component, with 2B and DULL surface finishes. Together the three stages will consume 1800 tonnes of stainless steel worth around $10 million.

The new car's design is sleek and modern. To this end, United Goninan has developed a patented system for spot welding to give the exposed sheeting superior aesthetic appearance.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 24, March 2003.

Stainless vision at Epping - Chatswood rail tunnel

The construction of the Epping to Chatswood rail line in Sydney is the largest publicly funded infrastructure project underway in New South Wales. The project, managed by the Transport Infrastructure Development Corporation, will increase the capacity of the CityRail network and provide direct rail access for the first time to the growing North Ryde/Macquarie Park area. Due to be completed in 2008, the 12.5 kilometre underground passenger line will include four new underground stations at Epping, Macquarie University, Macquarie Park and North Ryde.

Following a tender process, Contractors AW Edwards appointed ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Townsend Group to design, engineer, manufacture and install, for all four stations, a cavern lining/ceiling system, louvre and glass smoke baffles - forming part of the ventilation system. Additionally, they designed, manufactured and installed vitreous enamel panels to public areas, general composite panel cladding to services buildings, 316 stainless steel cladding for lifts and escalators and 304 patterned stainless steel for ceiling features, station facilities cladding, services risers and column cladding.

For the cladding components, Townsend purpose designed and engineered all fixings in 316 stainless steel to meet the high performance requirements of the project. The system also incorporated 304 patterned stainless steel wall and ceiling panels for which Townsend developed a fabrication technique which optimised both the aesthetics and strength of the panel. Overall, the project used some 160 tonnes of stainless steel.

Townsend Group had up to 100 people working on the project at the one time, spread across the 4 rail stations and at their warehouse and manufacturing facility in Sydney. They began their involvement in the project in September 2005, and are expected to complete the contract by April 2007.

This article appeared in Australian Stainess Issue 39 - Autumn 2007.

Photographs by Josh Hill Photography.

Stainless upgrade on track for rail stations

When ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Bridgeman Stainless won a tender to supply stainless steel balustrades for Queensland Rail, supplying quality materials with excellent fabrication techniques was at the forefront of their mind.

The upgrade of Oxford Park and Grovely rail stations in Brisbane’s North West was a 12-month project, headed by Arup and Moggill Constructions, and included significant use of stainless steel for the hand rails and balustrades.

Director Len Webb says the job was an excellent opportunity to showcase stainless steel at its best, rather than reverting to cheaper, less reliable materials and fabrication techniques.

“The project manager, Allan Bolt, and I had a number of meetings with Arup and Moggill to discuss how best to use stainless steel to its advantage,” he says.

Bridgeman Stainless supplied a prototype of the balustrades before any work began, to ensure issues such as tea-staining were addressed.

“By doing ASSDA’s Stainless Steel Specialist Course, we were able to confidently discuss the importance of using certain finishes to help prevent issues such as tea-staining,” Len said.

The project used 54 square metres of plate, and almost 5400 metres of 1.6mm tube in diameters of 50.0mm, 38.1mm and 15.88mm. All stainless steel supplied by Bridgeman was in grade 304 and was polished to a #600 grit.  The tube materials were supplied by Tubesales in Yatala, Queensland and the plate was supplied by Atlas Specialty Metals in Wacol.  The plate was polished by an external contractor.

The balustrades were largely made offsite but then transported to the stations where they were welded together.  The joints were then passivated, re-polished back to the #600 finish and then, finally, cleaned.

A maintenance prevention schedule will be delivered on completion of the job, paying particular attention to those areas where the stainless steel is undercover and not regularly cleaned by rain.

Bridgeman Stainless Project Manager Allan Bolt says the company’s commitment to ongoing education about stainless steel and their dedication to quality workmanship had secured their reputation in the industry.

trainstation

Moggill Constructions Senior Project Manager Marc Kuypers says the emphasis Bridgeman Stainless took on quality showed in their results.
“We hadn’t worked with Bridgeman Stainless before and we are quite impressed with their work,” Marc says.

Arup Superintendent Representative John Rutherfoord said he was particularly impressed by the quality of the work Bridgeman carried out on site.

John, Marc, Len and Allan agreed that the success of the project was due largely to the excellent communication between all parties involved.

Len said, as one of the first ASSDA Accredited Fabricators, Bridgeman Stainless thoroughly endorses the ASSDA Accredition program as it distinguishes fabricators with quality practices within the industry.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 42 - Summer 2008


Posted 1 July 2003

Vessel pictured is typical of those that use this type of fire damper.

A fire at sea is a traveller's worst nightmare. To guard against such a disaster there exist stringent safety standards, maintained through a process of testing and certification. The pre-eminent authority is Lloyd's Register of Shipping, an organization founded in 1760 to inform underwriters and merchants about the condition of the ships they insured and chartered.

Today, certification by Lloyd's Register is a significant commercial achievement. Earlier this year, Lloyd's issued a 'Certificate of Fire Approval' to a new stainless steel fire damper for use on merchant and passenger ships. Grade 316L stainless steel was used in the dampers because of its dual resistance to high temperatures and corrosion in a demanding marine environment.

In tests conducted by the Warrington Fire Research Group at CSIRO's North Ryde facility, the single-blade and multi-blade units made by ASSDA member Unique Metal Works were subjected to 900+¡C temperatures for an hour. They successfully prevented fire spreading across a nominal Class A-60 deck, in compliance with Lloyd's Register Rules and Regulations and the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.

The dampers were developed and fabricated by the Perth company, which utilises stainless steel to produce a variety of safety and environmental control equipment and other products. They are installed to isolate fire zones on a ship, for instance, where ventilation or air conditioning ducts pass from one zone to another. The controls can be electric or pneumatic depending on the ship's system. The blades are designed to remain open while the pneumatic power to the control actuators is maintained and to close down when there is a disruption to the supply. Under test conditions, this took 4 seconds for the 150mm x 150mm single-blade damper and 35 seconds for the 900mm x 900mm multi-blade type, well below the 90 seconds allowed.

UMW's certification is an example of Australian innovation being recognized internationally for high standards of materials, workmanship and construction.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 25, July 2003.

Photo courtesy of Austal Ships Pty Ltd. Vessel pictured is typical of those that use this type of fire damper.

Stainless integral to bridge's 300 year design life

Queensland’s largest ever road and bridge project will rely, in part, on innovation within the stainless steel industry to meet its design life of 300 years.

The Gateway Upgrade Project in Brisbane, which includes construction of a second Gateway Bridge and is being delivered by Queensland Motorways with design, construction and maintenance by the Leighton Abigroup Joint Venture (LAJV), will use reinforcement bar made for the first time from Outokumpu Group’s LDX 2101® duplex stainless steel.

A total of 130 tonnes of duplex stainless steel will be used in the bridge’s most critical structures: the splash zones of the two main river piers (28 tonnes of LDX 2101® have already been supplied and some Duplex 2205 will be used due to availability of dimensions for certain components).

Gateway Bridge Alliance Manager Gerry van der Wal said LDX2101® was chosen due to its high level of corrosion resistance (close to 316L) and low nickel content, which made it more cost effective and less susceptible to rapidly escalating worldwide nickel prices.

Outokumpu’s Qld and NT Manager Ken Hayes said that in bridge construction, stainless steel should be specified for parts where it makes a positive contribution, such as splash zones and the bridge deck.bridgepillar

“If carbon steel rebar is used, the bridge deck needs a water-proof membrane and the concrete must be of high quality, whereas if stainless rebar is used, reduced concrete cover can be specified, and it is also possible to relax the design criteria with respect to maximum crack width,” he said.

“As a result, with stainless rebar, bridges can be built either with no extra cost or for a lower cost than by using carbon steel reinforcement.”

Mr Hayes said LDX2101® offered the most cost-effective alternative for durable reinforced concrete structures and, due to its good price stability, it offered construction projects vitally important predictability.

“The win-win outcome from the use of LDX2101® is much improved sustainability in our constructed environment,” he said.

Because LDX2101® had never been used for rebar before this project, Outokumpu’s metallurgists carried out extensive tests to ensure it would withstand a high corrosion environment if the concrete were permeated by seawater.

A trial rebar coil was also sent to Atlas Specialty Metals’ Durinox facility in Melbourne to ensure it could be easily straightened.

Durinox Manager Colin McGill said they had to decoil the material, cut it to length and bend it to the appropriate shape.

“This was the first time we had processed the material and there were some challenges we had to overcome because of its very high strength,” Mr McGill said.

Once Outokumpu’s quality system and external testing criteria were approved by LAJV, the initial 28 tonnes of the hot rolled, ribbed, 16mm LDX2101® were delivered to Atlas Specialty Metals in Melbourne in 750kg coils for processing between October and December 2007.

The $1.88 billion Gateway Upgrade Project will be completed in 2011. It includes duplication of the original Gateway Bridge (which was completed in 1986), upgrade to 12km of the Gateway Motorway and construction of a new 7km deviation providing better access to Brisbane Airport.

Just over 20 years after it was constructed, the original Gateway Bridge is now exceeding capacity, carrying more than 100,000 vehicles each day.

When the duplication project is complete, the original bridge will carry six lanes of traffic north and the new bridge will carry six lanes of traffic south.

The new bridge is a 1.6km long balanced cantilever motorway bridge with the main span measuring 260 metres.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 42 - Summer 2008.

Photos courtesy of Leighton Abigroup Joint Venture.

Stainless frameless tankers make big Australian debut

McColl's Transport carts a variety of chemicals such as caustic soda and formaldehyde. The tanker barrel has been wrapped and not rolled, with full length stainless steel sheets used to eliminated circumferential welds. There’s a new breed of tanker being put through its paces along Australia’s east coast carrying aggressive chemicals and class three petroleum products for McColl’s Transport.

 

Dandenong based tanker manufacturer, Marshall Lethlean, has constructed FACT, a Frameless Aggressive Chemical Tanker with some unique operating attributes.

Marshall Lethlean constructed the 25,800 litre, 11.5m long stainless steel tanker with a chassis that’s up to 300 kilos lighter than conventional full frame designs.

Carting a variety of chemicals for McColls, such as caustic soda, formaldehyde and methanol, the barrel has been wrapped and not rolled, using full length stainless sheets to eliminate circumferential welds, a feature unique to Marshall Lethlean stainless steel tankers.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied grade 316 stainless steel sheet to Marshall Lethlean for the fabrication of what is believed to be the industry’s first frameless chemical tanker.

Finally, to give the tanker a bright, durable corrosion resistant finish, the coaming, chassis rails and tank rings were all electropolished by ASSDA member, MME Surface Finishing.

Orlando Iluffi, Marshall Lethlean’s Business Development Manager, says the FACT product was one of many new developments which will be released onto the market to better improve running costs and operating safety.

“We have worked on this new tanker in partnership with McColl’s for nearly two years just to get it right.

“Along the way, we have been able to improve our engineering skills to the point that it has led us toward other new concepts which we are all equally excited about.”

In June 2005, the Frameless Aggressive Chemical Tanker prototype began a six month trial period to test for ‘accelerated durability’.

After three and half months of the trial, McColl’s Workshop Manager, Rob Harrison said the company intends to “buy the tanker after the period” has completed in late December 2005.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 33, Spring 2005.

Stainless by the bus load

Newcastle's public transport stocks are to be boosted by the addition of 30 new stainless steel buses, the first of which was delivered this month.

Their advanced design combines passenger comfort with environmental awareness. The Volvo B12BLE bus chassis meets the latest Euro III exhaust emission standards, making it the cleanest diesel bus on Australian roads.The buses are being built by Custom Coaches, the largest Australian bus manufacturer with plants in New South Wales, South Australia and Queensland.

The buses are being built by Custom Coaches, the largest Australian bus manufacturer with plants in New South Wales, South Australia and Queensland. Stainless steel supply is by ASSDA member Fagersta Steels.

The buses have features to make travel easier for visually impaired passengers and those with restricted mobility. They include air-conditioning, anti-lock brakes and graffiti-resistant seats.

In commissioning the buses, the State Transit Authority of NSW emphasized economical operating and maintenance costs, fuel efficiency and competitive whole of life costs. International experience shows stainless steel delivers on these criteria thanks to its corrosion resistance, durability and weight-saving qualities.

The outlook for stainless in bus construction is positive, as more Australian bus owners and operators are becoming aware of the merits of stainless steel bodies compared with traditionally used coated carbon steel. In response to anticipated demand, Custom Coaches is currently investigating a range of stainless steel grades for future contracts.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 24, March 2003.

Stainless bus carries industry savings

Significant petrol savings, longer service life, lighter tare weight and reduced maintenance costs are just a few features of Australia's first stainless steel bus.

Two prototype buses with grade 304 stainless steel body shells are being manufactured by Gold Coast-based company, Bus Tech Pty Ltd for Volvo Australia.

Stainless steel buses are used extensively in Europe and the United States of America to guard against corrosion caused by icy, salted roads. Corrosion of buses is also a problem in Australia with vehicles subject to regular frame inspections and refurbishment costs. Corrosion in buses results not only from exposure to marine environments, but also from humidity and condensation and recycled water used for cleaning.

Bus Tech Manager, Frank Reardon, said the stainless steel bus had many advantages including corrosion resistance, reduced maintenance and operating costs.

"What will be extremely advantageous for operators is tat they can keep the stainless steel buses on the road for 10 to 15 years without having to constantly address corrosion issues common with carbon steel buses," Mr Reardon said.

A 700 kilogram reduction in tare weight of the bus has been achieved by using stainless steel, resulting in a $2 per kilometre saving in petrol and the ability for each vehicle to carry an additional nine passengers.

"With the increasing price of fuel, we were pushed by our clients to find a way to reduce the tare weight of the bus," Mr Reardon said.

"Using stainless steel has allowed us to provide this extra benefit."

A 15% reduction in production time has also been a feature of the stainless steel bus project.

Each bus is being constructed from 200 metre of square hollow sections (SHS) and 600 kilograms of stainless steel sheet, all grade 304 with a 2B finish.

The exterior and interior of the buses are attached to the stainless steel shell with a polyurethane adhesive, providing a bond line to keep out water and dust.

The exterior and interior of the buses are attached to the stainless steel shell with a polyurethane adhesive, providing a bond line to keep out water and dust.Fabrication of the stainless steel components was undertaken by Brisbane fabricators Metal Tech Industries and BJR Metal Rolling & Pressing, then delivered to Bus Tech for assembly. Stainless steel for the buses was supplied by ASSDA member Austral Wright Metals.

ASSDA provided literature and an in-house stainless steel seminar during the planning stages of the project.

The buses will be delivered to companies in Liverpool, New South Wales and the Gold Coast.

Mr Reardon said Bus Tech was pleased with the project and hopes to adopt stainless steel as a standard for their buses.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 18, May 2001.

Showcasing Adelaide Airport Using Glass and Stainless Steel

First impressions count the most when marketing a state to the rest of the world and Adelaide Airport achieved this aim with the construction and opening of a new terminal that combines glass and stainless steel to stunning effect.

Officially opened by Prime Minister John Howard on 7 October 2005, the new terminal is one of South Australia's most significant privately-funded infrastructure projects.

With 14 glass-sided aerobridges, the new terminal will give air travellers all-weather access for the first time in Adelaide Airport's 50 year-history and provide spectacular views across the Adelaide CBD and Mt Lofty Ranges on departure and arrival.

Developers for the Adelaide Airport engaged ASSDA member, Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications to supply stainless steel glass mounted handrails, glazing channels, guardrails and trolley rails.

More than two kilometres of handrail, 1.5 kilometres of guard railing and 150 metres of glazing channel were used in the $260 million project. The stainless steel glazing channel was a key architectural feature that provided Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications with an opportunity to demonstrate their skill and expertise.

The Adelaide-based company developed a unique welded interlocking channel for the 19mm thick glass to rest in using auto-CAD programming. Due to a unique welding process the channel remains straight and distortion free during manufacture and installation.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Sandvik Australia supplied grade 304 and 316 stainless steel pipe and plate to Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications for the project. ASSDA member, Stainless Tube Mills polished and buffed the welded stainless pipe to the architect's specification for a 320 grit finish.

Another ASSDA member, MME Surface Finishing polished the 6mm and 10mm plate. Advanced Cutting Technology cut the 2,000 brackets for the angles slots to create a specially designed wing shape effect.

Adelaide Airport Limited Managing Director, Mr Phil Baker, said “the new terminal will give an extremely positive impression of South Australia - something that we all recognise as important when positioning ourselves on the world stage.”

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34, Summer 2005.

School Building Gets a Splash of Stainless Colour

Showcasing the use of long lasting powder coated architectural finishes

The materials used for the Assembly Hall and Music Department of the Sacred Heart School of Performing Arts have set a new benchmark of possibility for the fusion between decorative and functional design.

ASSDA member Stainless Sections provided the stainless steel cladding for the Adelaide school building, for its hard wearing and low maintenance properties.  However, keeping to the creative nature of the activities to be performed within the building, a strong focus on the aesthetics was adopted.

The face side of the stainless steel was powder coated and then polished to produce a warm and coloured background.

Roy Carter of Stainless Sections says the product gives users the best of both worlds.

“The material allows the colour to be added without compromising wearability of the metal surface,” he says.  Roy also says the material facilitates ease of cleaning and graffiti removal.

The custom produced cladding panels used a 0.6mm base material, which was rigidised to a 1.2mm finish.  The material was installed as interlocking panels, complementing the linear building components.



This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 40

Safeguarding Lives in Central Queensland with Stainless

Following the tragic death of 15 people in the Palace Backpackers fire in the Central Queensland town of Childers in 2000, there were calls for tighter fire safety regulations.

Central Queensland University Rockhampton recently upgraded facilities at its Capricornia Residential College to increase safety, enhance student well being and ensure compliance with legislative requirements, building codes and duty of care.

CQU's Division of Facilities Management made alterations to Capricornia College as part of a $6.4 million project to upgrade facilities at Rockhampton, Gladstone, Bundaberg and Mackay campuses.

The CQU division worked alongside Andrews and Girle Architects, Project Services and John Foster Projects to schedule refurbishments during the College's low season to avoid major disruption to students.

ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Adnought Sheetmetal was contracted by John Foster Projects to fabricate 20 sets of stairs in grade 316 stainless steel mirror polish finish. Previous carbon steel handrails were replaced with stainless steel.

Adnought Sheetmetal also installed 30 radiation shields from 316 stainless steel perforated sheet supplied by ASSDA member Locker Group to minimise the risk of fire spreading to the stairwells.

According to Architect Russell Girle, the specification of stainless steel for the stairwells and radiation shields was essential to ensuring the safety of residents in the potential event of a fire.

“The upgrade uses a fire engineered model that is designed to keep the building tenable for a certain length of time to get people out”.

To enhance safety further hydrant mains were boosted and tactile surfaces and disabled access were upgraded.

CQU is committed to the safety of students, staff and members of the public on its campuses and the essential services upgrades ensure a high level of protection in the event of an emergency.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 35, Autumn 2006.

Reflecting Urban Renewal with Stainless Steel Cladding

Shining the way in major urban renewal precinct development is the Fujitsu Building, a speculative office building utilising stainless steel cladding to form a striking ‘gateway’ into Brisbane city.

Situated on Breakfast Creek Road, the five-storey Fujitsu Building is the first of three buildings in the ‘Portal Business Community’ to be developed by Ariadne Australia under a master plan by architects and planners, Cox Rayner.

‘Portal’ reflects an urban renewal of the former industrial site that has been used for petroleum storage and as a gasworks since the 1880’s including the preservation of Queensland’s oldest metal frame gasometer.

With this industrial setting in mind, the Fujitsu Building comprises economical materials and solar treatments to create intriguing textures in unconventional ways.

Whereas many speculative office buildings typically appear anonymous and soulless, the Fujitsu Building is an endeavour to demonstrate how speculative office buildings can be designed within meagre budgets to impart character reflective of place. This character was achieved by adopting an efficient floor plan and combining inexpensive materials such as stainless steel cladding.

The master plan concept turns the building through 90 degrees to north/south. This initiative optimises passive energy efficiency through screened and recessed glazing, ground level set-in, thermally insulated lightweight panel cladding and the concept of the roof as shade parasol.

Stramit Building Products selected uncoated stainless steel from their premium products range to create contrasted profilles and textures. ASSDA major sponsor, Austral Wright Metals provided technical assistance by recommending and supplying grade 445M2 stainless steel from ASSDA sponsor Nisshin Steel Company in Japan.

Grade 445M2 is a ferritic stainless steel that offers superior corrosion resistance compared to grade 316. A lower reflectivity matt finish was chosen for the site, next to one of the main roads into the Brisbane central business district. The matt finish doesn’t compromise the corrosion resistance of the grade, which is important as the Brisbane River is very close.

445M2 is suitable for roofing and cladding in marine environments and other areas where the environment is too severe for grade 304. Because it is ferritic, grade 445M2 has mechanical and physical properties more like carbon steel than the austenitic grades and is much easier to roll form into flat panels like those on the Fujitsu Building.

Thermal expansion is similar to carbon steel, so the grade can be designed with long roofing and cladding spans using well known practices.

The Fujitsu Building has received industry awards including the 2002 Queensland Metal Building Product Design award and the 2003 QMBA award for commercial projects over $10 million.

The final two buildings of the Portal Business Community will comprise a 42 apartment development with views of the Brisbane River and a four level office building modelled on the Fujitsu Building.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 29, September 2004.