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K-TIG: A Quantum Leap for Welding

Innovation Design Set to Transform the Industry

For the past six decades, the welding process has only been tweaked and modified, but one Adelaide company has developed a new process set to save millions of dollars and forever change the way welds are performed.

Revision of AS 1528: Fluid Transfer in Stainless Steel Tube and Fittings

Connections are vital

Any visit to a dairy, beverage or food processing plant will drive home the critical importance of the connections between the tanks, mixers, driers, pumps, etc. The image above (courtesy of TFG Group) showing an image of a brewery is a typical example. These tubes and/or pipes carry the process materials, the heating or cooling or wash water, gases, and also dispose of the wastes.

Under the Sun

‘Under the Sun’ is a 1300kg, 6.5m diameter suspended stainless steel sculpture that embodies a symbol of the moon floating over the earth, and casts filigreed shadows under the sun. It is an inspiring architectural piece featured at the entrance of Stockland’s Point Cook Town Centre in Victoria, and was completed in 2014 as part of the shopping centre’s $20 million revamp.

Star Light, Star Bright

The magic of a clear night sky filled with stars has inspired many creative souls. Now, through a collaboration between science and art, a stainless steel sculpture installed at the Australian National University in Canberra brings new depth to the connection between ourselves and the stars above.

General Corrosion Resistance
The normal state for stainless

Stainless steels resist corrosion because they have a self-repairing “passive” oxide film on the surface. As long as there is sufficient oxygen to maintain this film and provided that the level of corrosives is below the steel’s capacity of the particular material to repair itself, no corrosion occurs. If there is too high a level of (say) chlorides, pitting occurs. As an example, 316 works well in tap water (<250 ppm) all over Australia, but will rapidly corrode in seawater because seawater has very high chloride levels (20,000 ppm).