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Remembering a loved one - forever shining in stainless steel

When a loved one passes, you want to remember your special person's life with a suitable monument that reflects your love. After losing a loved one, two men came up with a shining memorial of stainless steel that would help make the memory of a loved one shine forever.

With no prior experience or previous interest in cemetery and crematorium industry, mechanical engineers Allan Burman and Albert Boer started a business to manufacture and supply modern stainless steel memorials.

Allan's daughter, Nicole, was a vibrant, energetic, artistic, high achieving, talented young woman. Unfortunately, Nicole was diagnosed with a serious brain tumour in her fifth year of medical studies. She was so determined to become a doctor that she successfully completed her medical degree after brain surgery.

Many other people in similar circumstances would have given up. Nicole successfully completed her internship while battling with a life threatening disease, but passed away during her specialist training and studies.

After Nicole's death they visited her grave which was surrounded by a sea of conventional colourless black, white and grey monuments. Even though many of these stone monuments were well presented they were not Nicole's style.

During this time they met other people who had lost a loved one and, like them, were dissatisfied with the memorials currently available.

They realized that there was a need and desire on the part of loved ones for a beautiful, long lasting, stylish alternative from those traditionally available. They believed that there must be a better way for people to remember their loved ones.

Much research and development has taken place at Forever Shining with the product range expanded to include monuments, headstones, plaques, urns and personalised memorabilia. In joint discussions with their wives, Susie and Judy, they drew upon their engineering knowledge and expertise and brainstormed various possible ideas, concepts and compatible materials to produce what they believed to be low maintenance memorials that were modern, structurally sound, durable and colourful.

Allan and Albert initially designed a prototype of a full size stainless steel monument complete with patented applied laser cut inscription and motif backed by glass to produce vibrant colour.

In the case of reburial, the cemetery staff can remove the whole monument from the grave in order to prevent any damage to the monument during the digging process.

This monument was featured on the New Inventors program on ABC Television.

Since that time, much research and development has taken place and their range of products has expanded considerably to include monuments, headstones, plaques, urns and personalized memorabilia.

The mission of Forever Shining is to produce beautiful, durable and long lasting memorials that the family and friends of the departed desire. These memorials are designed to preserve the memories of their loved ones for as long as possible for their families and future generations.

Forever Shining have incorporated proven new and old materials including stainless steel, granite, crystal and glass into modern styles and designs to give a new look which meet the expectations and needs of a changing society.

The company has developed an interactive website - www.forevershining.com.au - where potential customers can design their own memorial online.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 36, Winter 2006.

northern hospitality shines in stainless at bar zushi

Friendships in business are the key to success in Darwin's hospitality community. Like the many subtle flavours in sashimi, creating a Japanese restaurant such as Bar Zushi in the Casuarina Square Shopping Centre requires the co-ordination of many people and elements to design a truly inviting and friendly atmosphere.

 

Darwin-based company Brilliant Kitchens and Interiors won the HIA NT Housing Award in 2005 for Best Commercial Kitchen and Fitout for the unique restaurant design that features a waterfall centrepiece manufactured from stainless steel by local ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Northern Stainless.

  

Drawing customers to the restaurant is an exquisite eastern theme blending the rich colours of the curved jarrah timber and contrasted by modern stainless steel panelling.

Lining the length of the wall is a staggered garden arrangement of bamboo poles set in large white stones - a feature that further enhances the attractive, tropical experience.

To fit out the restaurant design, Brilliant Kitchens and Interiors called on Northern Stainless to fabricate the stainless waterfall and bench panel architectural features.

The three metre long water feature separates diners from the engine room where master chefs are preparing their next creation.

Northern Stainless specialises in the supply, fabrication and installation of stainless steel commercial products including custom made benches, handrails, grates, trays, trolleys, pipework, shelving and tanks.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 35, Autumn 2006.

Making a big entrance with stainless steel

Fusing industrial technology with the domestic aesthetic is a hard challenge, but Architect, Zelman McLaren of Z1 Designs has mastered it by transferring stainless steel industrial wire rope into an attractive household feature for front doors.

The stainless steel braided door pull creates a unique alternative, adding flair to house entrance designs.McLaren has combined both his profession of architecture with the industrial world of wire rope manufacture to invent a stunning range of braided door pulls that blur the lines between wall mounted art and the functional door pull.

The invention came about from a 'technology transfer' thanks to an 'Orbital Braider' invention developed by McLaren's father, Raymond McLaren of Andromeda Engineering.

The 'Orbital Braider' braids stainless steel wire into a rope which then acts as a stocking to lift and pull large electricity powerlines into place.

ASSDA member, Midway Metals in Newcastle supplied the 304 stainless steel for the bollards for the manufacture of the door pulls.

William Cotterill, Director of Australian Door Furniture said the design distinctly stands out as a product that will compliment any home or commercial premises.

"Its clean yet bold lines lend subtle curves that work on straight linear doors to the more rounded tropical style, lending a nautical feel to coastal properties," Mr Cotterill said.

The door pull series ranges from Z1 to Z8 and are supplied in both a polished and satin finish complete with stainless steel bollards.

Designs can be personalised with the addition of corporate logos / business names to the tops of the stainless steel bollard connectors.

The design will soon be available as a range of turn handles and will appeal to style conscious homeowners and our most renowned architects.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 27, February 2004.

 

Photos by Zelman McLaren, Z1 Designs

Lounge around in stainless steel daybeds from Klein

Lounge around in style on prestige daybeds featuring patterned stainless steel with a relaxed, resort aesthetic.

Klein Architectural's products include outdoor furniture such as the double deckchair, tables, water features, planters, mirrors and more.By night, the beds are a stunning poolside feature with a supplied light box gently projecting a kaleidoscope of colour on the swirling stainless steel surface.

Featuring one hundred percent waterproof UV rated upholstery with welded seams and castor wheels for easy mobility, the 'Ibiza' daybed is ideal for poolside entertaining.

ASSDA member, Klein Architectural has launched the 'Ibiza' daybeds nationally along with a range of other ultra-modern products designed to make life easier.

Working well in both commercial areas as well as in the home, some of Klein Architectural's products include outdoor furniture such as the double deckchair, tables, water features, planters, daybeds, shelving, sinks, vases, letterboxes and mirrors.

Designs include handrails and balustrades, planters, clocks, signage, cladding, stairs and nightclub refurbishments and fittings.

Klein Architectural produces a multitude of materials for both internal and external applications using the signature swirling effect. With over 30 years experience in the metalwork industry, Klein Architectural takes pride in their fine artistic creations fashioned from stainless steel.

The Ibiza daybed by Klein Architectural is ideal for poolside entertaining.Company director, Danny Klein, discovered the technique for creating the distinctive patterning design by chance but keeps the unique tooling method a closely guarded secret.

With a prime focus on providing durable and elegant stainless steel couture, all products are fabricated from stainless steel supplied by ASSDA Major Sponsor, Fagersta Steels.

Klein's artwork will be exclusively distributed by ASSDA member, Rimex Metals (Australia), a company that supplies a complete range of metal finishes for stainless steel.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005.

Fishing for compliments: stainless steel fish art

Steve Mason and his mate were sitting on a couch one day drinking beer when Steve came up with the idea of using stainless to turn his mate's wall into a work of art.

Steve's mate had just purchased a new unit with a large sea green wall. As the pair sat staring at the wall, Steve got an idea that would change his life ..... and complement his mate's wall.

"He wanted something to hang on the wall to break up the space, so I made him a school of eight mackerel," Mason said.

A boilermaker from Woodford, Queensland, Mason loves to go fishing and is inspired by pictures of fish in magazines, but soon found that choosing the right material was important.

"I heated some stainless to colour it and left it aside for about 18 months. When I found it again and noticed the colours had not faded significantly, I decided to make fish out of 316."

"The colours that appear and the sheen and lustre of 316 really suits fish" Mason said.

Working closely with fish photos and sketches, Mason tries to capture distinguishing features of each species including bream, barramundi, whiting, coral trout, marlin and many more.

Mason sources stainless steel scrap from ASSDA member Smorgon Steel Recyclers (Metalcorp, Hemmant - Queensland) and purchases grade 316 stainless steel sheet from ASSDA member Midway Metals (Queensland) to create many of his art sculptures.

Steve Mason now works full-time creating stainless steel fish art under the trading name of Masosa and sells his art through mailorder catalogue and in person at the Eumundi Markets, Queensland every Saturday morning.

Ranging from $145 to $3,000 in price, Steve's art now complements walls in cafes, fish and chip shops, art galleries and beside home pools. Best of all, it is the perfect present for one wall (or every wall) of any fishing fanatic.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 29, September 2004.

National Gallery of Victoria

Showcasing Art with Stainless

The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) houses one of Australia’s most important visual arts collections. However, with the passage of time, the collection had outgrown its facilities.

Since the existing building opened in 1968, the collection had doubled in size and only five percent of the Gallery’s collection was on display at any one time.

As part of a major upgrade and renovations to the existing Gallery, the Victorian State Government called on construction company Baulderstone Hornibrook to lead the project.

Architect Mario Bellini, from Milan, with Australian firm, Metier 3, used stainless steel to stunning effect in a design framework that seamlessly integrates the contemporary ‘metallic’ look of stainless whilst keeping much of the original heritage feature intact.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Sandvik supplied 10 tonnes of 304 stainless steel including solid bar, hot rolled flat and heavy angles for the project. Most of the stainless steel was surface linished by Silverstone and some was electropolished by ASSDA member MME Surface Finishing.

Applied Manufacturing fabricated glazed ramps and walkways, solid staunchens, glass panel frames and door surrounds for the courtyard in addition to balustrading, external handrails, rigging systems and feature mesh screens.

Fractal Systems supplied an imported stainless steel mesh product for the ceilings in the foyer and feature walls in the Federation Court.

This type of mesh consists of stainless steel rods in one direction and has stainless steel ropes threaded/woven in the other. Mesh was used for three reasons. Firstly it is semi-transparent, secondly it reflects light and finally it has an appealing visual texture, all dramatically influencing the ultimate sense of place.

In the feature walls, the mesh was mounted in panels framed with stainless steel angle frames bolted to the substructure. In the ceilings, the mesh was stretched over a curved sub-structure and tensioned at both ends. Other than these two main elements, stainless steel was used as floor cladding in locations where visual transition was required between two types of flooring (eg. parquetry and glass floors), as cladding to ceiling bulkheads and for struts in the glass roof trusses and cast hold-down ‘spiders’.

Zorana Zankasar from Metier 3 Architects, Victoria said that “stainless steel is almost a necessary component of the contemporary design. It is hard to imagine a major contemporary building without stainless steel”.

“I believe that because stainless steel offers trouble-free maintenance combined with the look of metallic”, said Zankasar.

The project started in January 2001 and the gallery was re-opened to the public in December 2003.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 28, May 2004.

Mirror Mirror on the Lake

A new Stockland housing development on the Gold Coast has incorporated the use of art to promote outdoor living and community engagement. And, with a public lake the intended destination, artists Lubi Thomas and Adrian Davis knew stainless steel would best fit the bill.

The Highland Reserve development in Upper Coomera, 40 minutes south of Brisbane, boasts a mountainous backdrop and sprawling native bushland.  The additional inclusion of a lake within the development prompted Stocklands to commission a public artwork for the area.  Following a process of concept pitches from various artists, Lubi Thomas and Adrian Davis of Davis-Thomas were successful in securing the project.

“They (Stockland) have always, until now, bought artwork off the shelf,” Lubi Thomas says.  “This time though, they wanted to do something site-specific.”

After spending time in the area the artists discovered the most evident thing about the lake was its mirror-like quality.  They were inspired by the lake’s rippling responses to wind changes and wanted to convey this relationship to the general public.

The result was a series of nine stainless steel floating wind ‘petals’, each with their own anchor point and dispersed across the lake.  The use of mirrored stainless steel meant the original concept delivery was met.

“We needed to find a material that was robust enough, as well as something that would reflect the lake itself,” says Lubi. “That is what inevitably drew us towards mirrored stainless.”

The pieces are made entirely of grade 316 in sheet, tube and flat bar to cater to the environment, and to ensure a life of 20-25 years. The added benefit is that ongoing maintenance is limited to removing the marks of nature.

ASSDA member and Accredited Fabricator Rocklea Pressed Metal supplied materials for the works, and was further engaged for part of the fabrication.

Troy Olive of Rocklea Pressed Metal said the CAD drawings were sent to them, enabling them to laser cut and roll the petals to the desired radius.  In total, 12-15 sheets of stainless steel was used.

The use of mirrored stainless  meant an additional relationship was explored between the lake and the sun.  In the right conditions, the pieces react to the sunshine hitting the water, beaming light between the pieces.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 40, Winter 2007.

Stainless Vision

Inspiration from Medieval Tale

The lance used by St George to slay the dragon in Medieval mythology - Ascalon - has inspired a stunning addition to Perth’s St George’s Cathedral forecourt.

Ascalon portraitAscalon, designed by Perth artist Marcus Canning and New York based Christian de Vietri, was chosen as the winning piece from an international competition attracting 99 entries.

The sculpture features an 18m grade 316 stainless steel telescopic pole with a mirror finish, surrounded by a billowing white fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) ‘cape’, which represents St George on his steed.

ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Diverse Welding Services was commissioned by engineers and project managers Capital House Australasia to create the pole, which weighs about 2 tonnes.

Capital House managing director John Knuckey said the artists had a vision for the sculpture and his team’s role was to make it happen. He said the strength of the central pole was a concern for the artists, while the structural engineers were strongly focussed on minimising vibrations and maximising stiffness.

Capital House’s research indicated that 316 would be the most appropriate grade and their interest in selecting from standard sections determined the dimensions.

“The pole also had to be dead straight because people would pick it by eye if it wasn’t,” Mr Knuckey said. “We had no desire to compromise on quality but we were concerned that polishing would be too expensive, so originally only the bottom third was going to be mirror polished. In the end Diverse Welding Services said they could achieve a mirror finish on the entire pole and they did an excellent job.

“At first we weren’t sure who to trust with the job, but once we had visited Diverse Welding’s factory, we knew they were the right people.”

Diverse Welding Services director Karl Schmidt said their main challenge was determining the weld design to ensure the work conformed to AS1554 Part 6.

They welded together stainless steel pipe in differing dimensions to create the telescopic shape of the pole and produced joining spigots from plate (supplied by ASSDA Member Stirlings Australia), enabling the pole to be bolted to the FRP ‘cape’.

Ascalon joining spigotsThe sections were rotated on horizontal positioners and welded using stainless steel flux cored wire and TIG welding processes. The pole was given a full mirror finish and passivated using a citric based product.

Artist Marcus Canning said Diverse Welding and Capital House were fantastic to work with on the project.

“It was a late decision to shift to a telescopic design, which increased the complexity of the job under a pressured timeline, but they rolled with it and did what they had to do to get the job done, and done right,” Mr Canning said.

“The pole is such an important element to the work now it’s in situ and responding to the elements - the mirror finish makes its quality shift dramatically throughout the day and night as lighting conditions change.”

The sculpture was created following a $500,000 donation from Australian prospecting geologist Marc Creasy to the Cathedral Arts Foundation, and the only guideline was the theme of St George and the dragon.

Images courtesy of Marcus Canning.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 48, Autumn 2011.

Stainless Screening

Combining Strength and Style

Melbourne based designer Pierre Le Roux began working with steel 15 years ago, more recently with stainless. “I love the high-tech, reflective quality of stainless,” he said.

Le Roux’s popular custom made wine rack design has attracted clients from both retail and domestic markets. Often doubling as a wallscreen, the unique rack is fabricated from grade 304, 3mm stainless steel sheet supplied by ASSDA member Dalsteel Metals. Each bottle holder was hand polished to achieve a personal finish.

Le Roux’s company produces custom made stainless pieces including sculpture, architectural and landscape features. Stainless domestic furniture and screening is becoming increasingly sought after and demand is largely surpassing supply. “The most common thing people say to me is that there’s just nothing out there, so they come for something unique,” Mr Le Roux said.

Creating one-off pieces to meet client specification means customer satisfaction and artistic flexibility. “This makes for a very rewarding profession,” said Le Roux.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Magazine - Issue 46, Winter 2009.

Tree of Knowledge

Aussie Icon Immortalised in Stainless

A 200-year-old Australian icon has been immortalised in a new stainless steel home. The ‘Tree of Knowledge’ is cherished as the birthplace of Australia’s labour movement. It is believed that shearers gathered under the tree in 1891, striking for workers’ rights.

The $6 million timber and stainless steel memorial was officially unveiled earlier this year in Barcaldine, Queensland to house the remains of the tree following its death in 2006. ASSDA Accredited fabricator St Clair Sheetmetal supplied and installed 6.5 tonnes of mirror finished stainless steel cladding to achieve a highly reflective surface and provide a durable and stunning monument.

“We clad all the trusses of the mirror finish stainless steel so it looks like a cathedral inside,” David St Clair said. “The panels make the light reflect down underneath and takes away the brown of the building,” he said. The heritage-listed site is now protected from the elements and the Tree of Knowledge has been given a new lease on life.

 


This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 46, Winter 2009.

Pop-up Stainless Space

New Potential for Mirror Finish

A multi-award winning building design is using stainless steel to reduce its visual impact. ‘Zoo Booth’ is a small free-standing kiosk at Victoria’s Healesville Sanctuary and – thanks to its mirror finished stainless cladding – is very well camouflaged! The design concept came from Melbourne company TS1 Pty Ltd, who launched Transportable Design 1 (TS1) Pop-up Buildings in 2006.

For the unique application at Healesville, ASSDA member Stainless Sections provided grade 304, 1.2 mm stainless steel sheet, polished to a No. 8 mirror finish to reflect the organic surroundings. Stainless
Sections’ Roy Carter said mirror finished stainless was the ideal material to achieve low visual impact in a natural setting whilst maintaining durability in an elemental location. TS1 is an expandable, relocatable space, completely construction-free and can be assembled in one day. It has become a popular solution to extending a living or work place, retail space or even for use as a spare bedroom.

TS1 Director Nadja Mott said her vision reflected a transient, nomadic lifestyle: her creations are transportable, low impact and fully recyclable. Mr Carter said the emerging market for reflective buildings has prompted further innovation to achieve solar reflection capture.

“This material allows concave shaping to be achieved which enhances marketing opportunities for mirror finished stainless in the growing green building market,” Mr Carter said.


This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 46, Winter 2009.

Vertical Landscaping

Ecologically Sustainable Stainless Design

With the population boom leaving less open space available for traditional garden beds, stainless steel is helping to reintroduce Mother Nature to an increasingly unnatural environment. Ecologically sustainable design (ESD) promotes the use of existing resources to maintain biological balance. This allows for natural light and ventilation, reduced energy usage, water consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The need for this type of specification is so apparent that the Government has established the Green Building Council of Australia (GBA) to advocate sustainable property development.

City of Melbourne was among the first to demonstrate ESD in Australia, with its own office building Council House No.2 (CH2). Green features such as natural lighting and temperature control earned CH2 the first GBA six-star Green Star Certified rating.

Among CH2’s green features is vertical landscaping created by ASSDA Member Ronstan Architectural. The specialist tensile contractors at Ronstan developed support systems for these gardens, fixing grade 316 stainless mesh and cables to the building’s exterior. Ronstan’s Rowan Murray said the benefits of green façades are now widely acknowledged. “Many new buildings include elements of active and passive solar design and have some sort of façade as a physical shade.

Using plants as a shade element is becoming increasingly popular and there are opportunities for the stainless steel industry to provide essential structure as a platform for plant growth,” he said. ‘Living walls’ can be more beneficial than conventional shading systems, both economically and environmentally. The plant’s ability to cool via evapotranspiration provides natural insulation, lowering the building’s running costs, while producing oxygen at the same time. “This in itself provides a direct social and psychological benefit to the building occupants, driving people to engage with the building,” Mr Murray said.

“People actually enjoy the close proximity to plant life and stainless steel plays a big part in making this possible,” he said. Mr Murray said design considerations are important when specifying for this type of application, particularly “dead weight” from suspended sheet and plant matte, wind and rain force, but careful design ensures an efficient lightweight stainless solution. Specifying ESD is also beneficial to your budget.

“We love to see stainless used in intelligent ways with façades and the good news is that despite the current climate we are gradually seeing developers begin to take a more responsible approach to the upfront cost of ESD,” Mr Murray said. A recent GBA report denotes the value in green features, such as stainless façades, claiming the study proved that “green buildings make occupants healthy, wealthy and wise”. GBA recently awarded its 100th green star to a sustainable interior design at Stockland Head Office in Sydney.


This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 46, Winter 2009.

Stainless protects old for young

Posted 2nd December 2009

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Historic remnants from the original Australian Hotel site in The Rocks will be preserved for future generations by stainless steel grillage platforms. ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Paige Stainless supplied and fitted the platforms for Auswave Products Pty Ltd as part of the site’s recent redevelopment.

The sandstone ruins, which date from the 1800s, are now on display within the recently completed Sydney Harbour Youth Hostel Australia (YHA), which was designed by Tzannes Architects and constructed by Built Pty Ltd.

Auswave Products Director Doug Matthews said creative thinking was required to provide a high quality access platform, matching steps and landings that would be totally accessible and easily maintained, blending the past and the present within a modern building project.

“This was achieved with the expert team at Paige Stainless and the outcome is a magnificent architectural solution,” Mr Matthews said.

Paige Stainless Director Kevin Finn said the ruins had previously been built over but, during the latest redevelopment, Sydney City Council felt it was important to save the heritage associated with the site.

Mr Finn said Paige Stainless supplied and fitted around 50 square metres of PAIGE STAINLESS HEELGUARD® flooring for the main entrance to the building, which lies about one metre above the cellar area of the original hotel.

Grade 304 stainless steel supplied by ASSDA Member Atlas Specialty Metals was used for the grillage due to its longevity in this inert environment, as well as its appearance.

“This was a very cool project to be involved in, not only because the new building is impressive in itself, but also because of the historic factors,” he said.

“Heelguard was used so that visitors could view the ruins through the grillage and also to enable natural light and ventilation to flow through to the ruins below.”

Mr Finn said safety was also an issue: the 5mm gaps between the grillage means that high heel shoes and toes can not get through and Australian Standards for slip resistance are exceeded.

The flooring is made of multiple panels that are fixed to a sub-frame designed by Paige Stainless. Each panel can be removed independently from the adjacent one if necessary, ensuring easy access if required.

ASSDA MEMBER CONTACTS
Paige Stainless
27 Cessna Drive
CABOOLTURE QLD 4510
Ph (07) 5499 1511
www.paigestainless.com.au

Atlas Specialty Metals
www.atlasmetals.com.au

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nature provides inspiration

Posted 14th December 2009

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Working with stainless could only be described as a labour of love for retired engineer and designer Allen Minogue. After a 25 year career with ASSDA Accredited Townsend Group, Mr Minogue continues to work with stainless steel, creating larger than life sculptures from the material. His latest creation, The Jumping Barramundi, has been a year in production, stands 1.125m high and weighs 75kg.

Mr Minogue said he had spent quite a bit of time in Darwin and the Kimberley, which has inspired much of his work, including the dancing brolgas featured in Australian Stainless. “I look for ideas in nature and I couldn’t resist the lure of this iconic NT fish,” Mr Minogue said.

The sculpture features an internal stainless steel frame with a fibreglass body. Over 2000 scales were cut from .55mm thick grade 316 stainless steel, which were hand polished and screwed to the fibreglass body. The head, tail and fins were cast from 316 stainless, sandblasted and polished.

Mr Minogue works exclusively with stainless steel, which he sources from ASSDA Member Dalsteel Metals Pty Ltd.

CONTACT

Dalsteel Metals Pty Ltd
www.dalsteel.com.au

Townsend Group
www.townsendgroup.com.au

Allen Minogue
Ph 02 9528 9877
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Australian innovation

Posted 21st April 2010

 

The ridges on the KAG Rail enable Volunteer Marine Rescue crew to  secure a better grip.

Marine applications of stainless steel have traditionally relied on the material’s corrosion resistance and strength. But when it comes to marine rescue vessels, safety is also a top priority.

Southport’s Volunteer Marine Rescue (VMR) is currently trialling an Australian innovation designed to enhance safety.

The Klein Architectural Grip (KAG) Rail, developed by ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Klein Architectural (Slacks Creek, Queensland), has permanent swages and ridges that fit the shape of a closed hand.

The ‘non-slip’ rail was originally designed for the industrial marine sector, where rails and workers’ hands are often wet and greasy, causing slippage on ladders.

In addition to the VMR, the rail is now being trialled on steep ladders at Wivenhoe Dam, Queensland and is suitable for use in a range of industries requiring a high level of safety, including mining, construction, heavy industrial, manufacturing, transport, oil and gas, power stations, and the aged care sector.

VMR Unit Training Co-ordinator Ken Gibbs said two Grade 316 rails were currently installed on their 8 metre Noosa Cat ‘Marine Rescue 2’ and had been tested in all types of weather conditions.

“We’ve got about 30 skippers who work in rotation and the feedback we’re getting is really positive,” Mr Gibbs said.

“The general consensus is that the rail offers superior holding capacity in both wet and dry conditions, without compromising strength.”

Mr Gibbs said during search and rescue operations, the weather was generally foul with water often taken over the bow of the vessel, making the hand rails slippery and testing both skipper and crew.

“Being able to fit our fingers into the ridges gives us a better grip and makes the operation much safer,” he said.

Klein Architectural Director Danny Klein said independent testing had shown the rail reduces handrail slippage by 80 per cent in comparison with regular stainless steel tube.

“The rail can also be fabricated in both left and right hand configurations, which would allow visually impaired people to identify in advance what a staircase is about to do,” Mr Klein said.

The KAG Rail is made to order and is available in a number of different stainless steel grades, depending on the application. The rails can be retro fitted or installed on new projects. Services such as water, electrical, air/gas and data can be hidden in the tube.

A patent is currently pending on the product, which complies with AS1428.1. Mr Klein said the Standard does not currently make particular reference to grip or slip, but the company was lobbying for this to be changed.

CONTACTS

Klein Architectural Pty Ltd
www.klein.net.au

VMR for blog

Workshop

Close up

Coloured Facade

Maximum impact two years on

Coloured stainless steel has helped revitalise what has become one of Victoria’s largest and most recognisable shopping precincts – Westfield Doncaster.

In late 2008 Westfield completed a major redevelopment and refurbishment of the Doncaster shopping centre (located 20 minutes east of Melbourne’s CBD), doubling the complex’s size.

Central to the centre’s new look and feel is the building’s ultra contemporary and striking cladded facade that features coloured and patterned stainless steel supplied by Steel Color Australia Pty Ltd.

Steel Color Australia owner Vince Araullo said more than 600 square metres of grade 304 stainless steel were used to construct the eye-catching “Red Wall”.

“The brief from the designers, Westfield Design and Construction, was to deliver a contemporary looking facade that not only provided the Doncaster shopping centre with plenty of colour but would also be hard wearing against Melbourne’s diverse weather conditions,” he said.

“Our coloured stainless steel, which we import from Italy and distribute exclusively in Australia and New Zealand, is manufactured by Europe’s leading specialist in coloured stainless steel and special metal finishes – Steel Color S.p.a.”

The stainless sheeting was fabricated and installed by Melbourne-based Barden-Steeldeck Industries. Manager and part-owner Michael Shacklock said this was the first time his company had worked with coloured stainless steel.

“By attaching the sheets to a sub-frame we were able to make certain that all 300 sheets of coloured stainless steel were accurately positioned to deliver the distinctive looking facade,” Mr Shacklock said.

Mr Araullo said the colour refraction from the Rosso (Italian for red) stainless steel provided a changing colour palette depending on the time of the day and viewing angle.

“The unique movement of colour across the stainless steel clad entrance is a major shift forward from traditionally sterile looking facades that appear on many shopping centres,” he said.

To avoid the potential reflectivity of the facade hindering nearby traffic safety, a Perla pattern was specified. The indentations of the pattern diffuse light and provide an optical flatness, which effectively eliminates reflections.

The pattern also provided improved strength, allowing for a lighter gauge of 1.2mm instead of, typically, 1.5mm or more.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 47, Spring 2010.