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Stainless Bathing Box of Shattered Dreams

Tamarama Beach or as local Sydneysiders call it 'Glamarama Beach', is well known as the place for beautiful people to be seen and for the rest of us to dream.

 

Artist, Graham Chalcroft set out to distort self-image in the name of fun by capitalising on the beach's former fairground history to design and fabricate a sculpture - 'Bathing Box: the impossible change room of shattered dreams'.

The stainless steel sculpture was a crowd favourite at the 'Sculpture by the Sea' exhibition held in November 2003 from Bondi Beach to Tamarama Beach in Sydney NSW.

The sculpture's design aesthetic was inspired by archival images of traditional late 19th century bathing boxes and how they have evolved.

Each sculpture profile is based on the curves of the human form - one male and one female. On approaching the convex/concave doors, the mirror distorts the body with startling effects.

ASSDA member, Stainless Sections, kindly donated six sheets of 304 with a No. 8 mirror finish for profiles fitted inside the doorframes.

For accuracy and efficiency, Chalcroft use T & M Engineering Group in Smithfield to computer design and laser cut the sheets to be clamped on the structural wood faces and strips.

"The stainless steel performed extremely well. It handled well in fabrication and the thick protective coating saved the steel from potential scratching," said Graham Chalcroft.

"The mirrored steel coped with the heat, wind, salt spray and suffered no scratching from the many thousands of hands touching the artwork," he said.

'Sculpture by the Sea' is in its seventh year and is the largest free outdoors sculpture exhibition in the worlds with over 200,000 visitors.

Photos by Graham Chalcroft.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 27, February 2004.

Cleaning and Protecting Stainless Sculptures

"Windhover" is a dramatic stainless steel sculpture created by the late Lenton Parr, located on the eastern foreshore of Port Phillip Bay in Sandringham, Melbourne.

Unveiled in December 2001, the sculpture's vertical lines and arcs are evocative of the yachts often seen sailing out on the Bay.

However, two and a half years of zero maintenance and exposure to salt spray from the bay have taken their toll, turning the surface of the stainless steel a blotchy brown.

Called tea staining, it's caused by deposition of salt on the surface which is then trapped in the crevices of the brushed finish.

Regular reactivation by rain has perpetuated a corrosion cycle leading to quite rapid and severe surface staining.

The problem was how to clean the sculpture and then to ensure that it would remain protected from tea staining in the future.

Conventional weld pickling products containing hydrofluoric acid are very aggressive and risk damage to or discolouration of the surface.

Strong acids may also create an environmental and safety hazard when used in such a public place.

Many cleaning formulations are available based on phosphoric, sulphamic, oxalic or nitric acids. They have various degrees of handling and disposal restrictions.

The formulations may also contain mid abrasives and wetting agents/detergents to aid the cleaning process.

In July 2004, ASSDA Member, Revolution Advanced Metals and Materials, used a cleaning paste based on a moderate concentration of phosphoric acid which is relatively safe to handle.

Inadvertent skin contact by this product does not cause the burning and possible ulceration associated with strong concentrations of nitric and hydrofluoric acid preparations.

The cleaning product was brushed on and left to react for 3-4 hours. The brown tea staining gradually disappeared.

In some particularly bad sections a second application was necessary to completely remove all traces of the staining, but it left a completely blemish-free surface.

In this case, residue from the cleaning product was simply washed away with water. In other cases, however, check with local authorities for correct disposal procedures.

One of the problems when washing stainless steel with water is the streaking caused by uneven drying.

This was very noticeable on the sculpture.

Also, because it is unlikely that ongoing regular cleaning will occur, it is also important to limit the access of chlorides to the surface. Otherwise the staining problem will recur.

To overcome both these problems, a water-based protective product with oils and non-ionic surfactants but no phosphates was sprayed on and wiped over.

After polishing with a dry cloth all streaking vanished. It left an invisible film that stopped further streaking and fingermarks.

Best of all, it brought up the lustre of the brushed finish, and left Windhover looking as good as the day it was made.

Regular re-application should maintain the finish and help prevent tea staining in future.

Correct design, fabrication and on-going maintenance will all assist in keeping stainless steel sculptures and other structures erected adjacent to the coast in good condition.

Words and images courtesy of Jim Picot, Revolution Advanced Metals & Materials.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 29, September 2004.


Posted 31 January 2005

Sydney's New Year's Eve has always been celebrated in spectacular style and this year's event shined with the inclusion of a giant glitter ball featuring stainless steel.

Hanging from the Sydney Harbour Bridge was 'Fanfare', a five storey-high spherical structure covered in 354 stainless steel pinwheels that spin as the ball rotates.

The sculpture, designed by New Zealand artist Neil Dawson, is Sydney's first three-dimensional bridge effect in the event's history.

ASSDA major sponsor, Sandvik Australia Pty Ltd and ASSDA member, Stainless Sections supplied 90 sheets of 10' x 4' x 1mm or approximately 2.7 tonnes of stainless steel in number 8 finish to ASSDA member, DME Engineering Services for the fabrication of the pinwheels surrounding the structure.

During the day the pinwheels of  'Fanfare' spin in the winds of Sydney Harbour reflecting the many colours of the sky. At night the sculpture becomes a part of the light show, acting as a canvas for projections and reflections.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Stainless technology to remember war heroes

The Australian War Memorial in Hyde Park Corner, London stands as a symbol of freedom and an enduring spirit of strength.

To commemorate the men and women who fought and died for Australia alongside Britons in the two World Wars, Australian architectural firm Tonkin Zulaikha Greer and artist Janet Laurence designed the Memorial to reflect the sweep of the Australian landscape.

The result was a highly durable structure featuring a long, curved wave wall constructed out of West Australian green granite and supported by grade 316L stainless steel.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, and ASSDA members, M & S Stainless Supplies and Dalsteel Stainless supplied approximately 9000 kilos of stainless steel for the structure including 8mm plate, pipe, angles and 3mm sheet.

Grade 316L was specified for its corrosion resistance, particularly as the Memorial comprises a water feature that periodically cascades water across the wall to highlight the names of the hometowns of our soldiers.

Stainless steel was used primarily in the construction of stainless steel cradles which were fabricated in Australia, shipped, positioned and lifted into place to support the granite.

All welds were pickled and passivated to provide protection from the bromine and chlorine’s likely to be deposited on the frames from the water forms built into the Memorial.

Australian-based firm Design and Survey Neon (DSN) played a leading role in the design and manufacture of the supporting structure by using 3D modelling techniques.

The 3D modelling allowed the manufacture of components and assembly of the job to become a seamless process.

DSN modelled the granite wave wall and supporting cradles. The templates for the granite blocks and their fixings were then lifted from the model to enable the fixings to be pre-drilled prior to assembly.

The use of laser cutting and CNC technologies allowed DSN to fabricate to near machining tolerances. Laser etching of assembly notches were added for simple fabrication and installation.

Coordinates for supporting cradles from the model were used to determine correct on-site positioning via electronic theodolites.

The granite blocks were positioned with a 6mm gap vertically and horizontally to a tolerance of plus or minus 1mm. Precise accuracy was required to avoid accumulation of errors because of its wave like design.

Most of the components for the Memorial were imported from Australia. Water features and water effects were created by Waterforms International and all the stone work was assembled by Australians.

This article was featured in Australian Stainless Issue 28, May 2004.

Photos courtesy of Department of Veteran Affairs & Design and Survey Neon (DSN).

Main image: The Australian War Memorial 'Dedication Day Wreaths' placed in front of the curved granite wave wall. Photo courtesy of the Department of Veterans Affairs, copyright Commonwealth of Australia. Reproduced by permission.

Other images: 316 stainless steel cradles were lifted into place to support the granite blocks that form the wave wall.


Posted 1 July 2005

These extraordinary sculptures shine with life when fashioned from stainless steel, demonstrating the diversity and beauty of the material.

Stainless Steel Lacewing - Brisbane, Australia Stainless Steel Brolga - Sydney, Australia

Main image:
Stainless Steel Snake 'Soho" - Artist: Damien Elderfield
Fabricated by Damien Elderfield, Melbourne

Left:
Stainless Steel Lacewing - Artist: John Coleman
Queensland Cultural Centre Busway, Brisbane

Right:
Stainless Steel Brolga - Artist: Allen Minogue
Fabricated by Townsend Group, Sydney

These images were featured in Australian Stainless Issue 32, Winter 2005.

Strata: A Majestic Streetscape in Stainless Steel

When South Australian developer, John Culshaw of Pentroth Pty Ltd proposed the design for the Majestic Roof Garden Hotel in Adelaide, the original proposal was for plain vertical bars for the car park grille of the Bent Street facade

Instead of surrendering to drab, pre-fab vertical bar grille designs, the developer actively sought a stylish alternative to the car park status quo. He commissioned artists Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell to create ‘Strata’, a stainless steel grille design that aesthetically showcases the hotel building and provides a ‘majestic streetscape’ experience for Bent Street pedestrians.

The artists’ intention was to excise the barrier that would be created by the vertical security bars, which were uninviting at street level. Taking this as their starting point, they researched the replacement of verticals with horizontals to create a calm but dynamic form.

Strata lines of sandstone (used on the Frome Street facade of the hotel), contour lines, isobars from weather charts and the winged roof line of the hotel all helped to drive the inspiration for the unique design. From these lines, the artists devised a series of twenty-two panels, in sets of one, two and three. Each set is a unique design so that the complexity of the concept was acknowledged.

The grille runs the length of the hotel on Bent Street, integrates with the building and the electrically operated entrance doors to the car park and storage areas of the hotel. The nature of these horizontal waving lines creates a dynamic effect because it seems that they swing in and out because of an optical illusion when viewed from an oblique angle. By day the sky and daylight are reflected from the satin surface of the steel and at night the street and hotel lighting is reflected.

The artists chose stainless steel for their artwork for several reasons. The material used had to be strong to fulfill the structural requirements of a security grille. The artists also required it to be aesthetically complementary to the contemporary and stylish design of the hotel.

The artists went through an intense design development stage to arrive at a formula for the curving lines that worked visually. Using this formula each panel was then drawn on a computer as vector lines, which were then converted to DXF files for driving the laser cutting equipment.

The panels were fabricated by Donato Steel Fabrications from 4mm thick 304 grade stainless steel sheet supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Sandvik Australia Pty Ltd. The artists’ designs were laser cut by Molnar Laser Cutting Services and then plate linished both sides to a number four satin finish. The sheets were then welded on the inside into the frames constructed of 38mm square stainless steel tube supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals.

The intention with these panels was to create a frame within a frame, the second frame being the walls and pillars of the hotel into which they were bolted. Therefore, the construction of the panels became part of the artwork.

The artists are very pleased with the result of the installation of ‘Strata’. Pentroth Pty Ltd and the Adelaide City Council are pleased that it adds to the ambience of Bent Street and creates a lively streetscape for pedestrians. Opposite the Hotel (and currently under construction) are Bent Street Apartments which will have retail facilities at ground floor level – ‘Strata’ provides a pleasant environment on the street which is also overlooked by the apartments above.

The stainless steel fabrication meets all the requirements of a car park security grille while providing a lively streetscape in the city. The artists believe this is a good example of creating something meaningful out of a necessity. That is, a car park grille that had to be created but it did not need to be ugly and aggressive for pedestrians at street level or for those living in the adjacent apartments.

Images courtesy of Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Stainless Metal Craft

Artisans of Fabrication

Traditionally artisans of yesteryears searched for the right stone or timber and personally hand carved their works of art. However, modern artists and sculptors now work collaboratively to create sculptures using a wider range of materials including stainless steel

Installation artist, Marion Borgelt is a modern artist who in early 2005 completed the most significant work in her 25 year career. However, this is no public installation.

Located high on the 32nd floor of the JP Morgan Chase building overlooking Circular Quay, 'Time and Tide (wait for no man)' features 16 stainless steel spheres resting on an ascending spiral of 16 sandstone pliths. The 4000 kilogram sculpture represents the different phases of the moon and demonstrates how people in corporate life are governed by the global clock.

ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Stainless Metal Craft took up a challenge that some of the metal workers never faced before. Mimicking artisans of years gone by, man and machine merged through the use of skilled computer experts and metal workers.

Many hours were spent in the complex machining operation and many more in the mirror polishing, to complete the 16 hollow spheres. The team of modern fabricators at Stainless Metal Craft worked tirelessly to bring Borgelt's design to fruition.

Based in Emu Plains, Stainless Metal Craft uses the latest processes and technology to manufacture architectural and commercial building products for industries such as health, aged care, councils, government and schools.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 35, Autumn 2006.

Stainless steel 'Travellers' mark journey of migration
Telling the tale of migration to Victoria is 'The Travellers', a series of giant stainless steel sculptures sliding quietly across the Sandridge Rail Bridge on Melbourne's Yarra River.

Stainless Steel 'Travellers' Mark Journey of MigrationUnveiled just three days from the start of the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, the 10 sculptures are a tribute to multiculturalism.

Each of 'The Travellers' figures represents a period from our Indigenous and immigrant histories (as defined by historian Dr James Jupp) and were designed by Lebanese Artist, Nadim Karam of Atelier Hapsitus.

'Gayip - The Aboriginal Period', the first sculpture, is stationed permanently on the river bank to depict the Indigenous owners of the area who were here already.

Nine of the 10 sculptures cross the river three times a day on a fixed bogie system to represent stages of migration in Australia's history from the convict and gold rush periods through to European and refugee settlement.

More than 3.7 km of stainless steel (in 4455 pieces) was used to create the sculptures.

ASSDA member, Silverstone Engineering fabricated the majority of the 10 sculptures from grade 316 stainless steel supplied by ASSDA Major Sponsors, Sandvik Australia Pty Ltd, Atlas Steels and ASSDA Member, Midway Metals Pty Ltd.

Each of 'The Travellers' figures represents a period fro ou Indigenous and immigrant histories.The remaining stainless steel sculptures were fabricated by Danfab, JW Metal and Able Engineering.

Stainless steel rectangular hollow sections were used on the outer frames. The inner rails were made of pipe and bar. Some of these rectangular hollow sections were inductarolled (rolled after heating by using an induction furnace) by Melbourne company, Inductabend, with a discoloured zone or heat band running around the material.

The sculptures required much tighter radii than had previously been delivered, and Inductabend's equipment was pushed to its limits when bending the steel sections.

Following fabrication, the sculptures were then polished to 0.4 Ra, cleaned and then passivated to ensure high corrosion resistance.

Originally built in 1888 by David Munro, the Sandridge Bridge is considered one of the earliest examples of steel girder bridge construction in Australia.

The $3 million 'Travellers' sculptures project was part of an $18.5 million Sandridge Bridge Precinct development funded by the City of Melbourne and the State Government that includes a new pedestrian bridge, a plaza and a youth precinct on the north bank.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 36, Winter 2006.

Big Fish Swimming in a Small Pond

Northern Territorians know their barramundi, which is why ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Northern Stainless had to get it absolutely right when they reeled in the contract to design and fabricate this 1030mm specimen.

The silver fish has a mythical reputation in the NT, not least because of its shimmering, silver appearance.

Northern Stainless operations manager Darren Colbert said they had no hesitation in saying they could get the job done to their client's satisfaction, because of their ability to create the barra's mesmerising shimmer in stainless steel.

We knew stainless was the right material for the job because we needed the water feature to last in Darwin's tropical environment, as well as best represent the barra's colour, Mr Colbert said.

We promised the client that we would create something that everyone would want to steal and I reckon we delivered.

The fish, which was commissioned for Osborne Family Holdings Hastings over Mindil apartment complex in Fannie Bay, Darwin, was fabricated from around 15kg of 316 stainless steel with a No. 4 finish. It was then regrained and the scales were polished into it. A 6mm tube sits inside, enabling the water to spray the gill plate.

Mr Colbert said one of the challenges of the project was converting a graphic design program to create a laser file.

The barra was cut out flat with a laser, then rolled and hand curved to create the three dimensional sculpture.

When it is installed in situ (expected to be late October 2006), there will be a fishing rod mounted on the wall of the water feature, with an optic fibre fishing line threaded with a stainless steel fly hook. The entire sculpture will rock slightly, creating turbulence in the water and giving the impression that the barra is working hard against being reeled in.

This barra may not enjoy the freedom of the NT's waters, but it will certainly garner the same admiration as the real thing.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 37, October 2006.

Stainless Steel Launches its Artistic Merit

Internationally renowned, Yackandandah based sculptor Benjamin Gilbert was commissioned to create a series of sculptures for Melbourne’s Commonwealth Games.  Extending six metres in the air, the exhibits laid testament to three different stages of a pole–volter whilst displaying the versatility and artistic merit of stainless steel.

Benjamin used grade 304 stainless steel, supplied by ASSDA major sponsor Atlas Specialty Metals in Wadanga.  He has worked with stainless steel for 10 years and believes it is cost effective and cheaper to use than other materials. Also, the added ability of using off cuts in his work suited Benjamin’s ‘green’ focus.

“As a practising environmentalist, there are some good arguments for using stainless steel,” Benjamin says.

Indeed, stainless steel is one of the most recycled metals in the world and, according to the International Stainless Steel Forum, any given stainless steel object has an average recycled content of about 60%.  Benjamin also says the fact that stainless steel doesn’t need to be finished (ie painted) makes it an attractive material.

“For what you pay extra in materials, you don’t need to spend on additives.”

Using a sculpting technique taught to him during his time in Estonia, Benjamin has successfully adapted it for use with stainless steel.

The sculptures used up to 100kg of stainless steel – 1mm sheet, 5mm rod and a 25mm square tube substructure underwater.  With the ability to flex in the wind, the 35mm poles are re-enforced with inner tube to build up spring, similar to a leaf spring on a trailer suspension.

Benjamin enjoys ‘non-trade’ related thinking with his designs and, although he admits to having difficulty sourcing tools in Australia, he says the lighter, thinner materials are easy to use when spot welding and give greater flexibility when using metal shears.

During his work, Benjamin used a thin disk on a 5” grinder and a stainless steel wire wheel to ‘texturise’ the surface.  He believes there is “a lot more that can be done with finishes”, particularly by hand.

Other projects Benjamin has worked on, incorporating the use of stainless steel,  include a life size work of the Ned Kelly Gang (at Beechworth) and a bigger public artwork for the Camden Museum and Library redevelopment in South Sydney.  Once completed, in late January, a 16 metre grapevine in stainless steel will be exhibited, in recognition of the first grapevine in Australia.

Photograph by Rob Lacey Photography, Wodanga.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 38, Summer 2006.

Whale of a Time

Longevity won’t be an issue with the latest version of this sculpture. Cherry Blossom first appeared as an ice sculpture - complete with spinning cogs - in the 2008 Russian Ice Cup.

After winning the Mayor’s prize its creator, Melbourne-based artist Benjamin Gilbert, constructed a stainless steel version for Bondi’s “Sculpture by the Sea” exhibition.

ASSDA Member Atlas Steels sponsored the project, providing 316 stainless to suit the coastal environment.

Mr Gilbert specified stainless steel for its neutral colour, polishing the surface with stainless wire brushes to allow salts to build up. 

“I don’t really like shiny stainless finishes. A patina is more realistic and neutralises visual effects from its surroundings,” he said.

The panels were both TIG and MIG welded, pickled and polished to achieve a buffed silver leaf effect.

“The work is a combination of Harold Holt mystery and my work with Greenpeace and the Wilderness Society,” Mr Gilbert said.

“It is the first large work I’ve made purely for my own satisfaction in years.”

Cherry Blossom is showing at Canberra’s Corinbank Arts Festival in late February and will then travel to Europe for Denmark’s version of “Sculpture by the Sea” in May.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 45, Summer 2009.

Stainless spirit out of this world

The grand scale of Rings of Saturn at Melbourne’s Heide Museum of Modern Art takes on even more significance when you learn about the artist.

sculptureRenowned Australian sculptor Inge King AM was born in Germany in 1918, moving to Australia in 1951 and forging her career despite a culturally conservative landscape at the time.

The 89-year-old artist created the 400cm x 600cm x 500cm Rings of Saturn in 2005-2006 as part of her Celestial Series, using stainless steel to create the sense of floating, lightness and reflection that prevails in outerspace.

“Stainless steel is not suitable for every work, but these pieces were inspired by a story on space research I saw on TV and they needed a certain spirit,” Ms King said.

“By using stainless steel with a sanded finish, the piece is very durable and it breaks and reflects the light, so at any time of the day it looks different.”

Ms King makes scale models of her sculptures, but the physical demands of creating the final work requires her to contract out the fabrication.

Using Ms King’s 50cm model of Rings of Saturn, Melbourne fabricator Robert Hook co-ordinated the laser cutting of about 3 tonnes of 5mm grade 316 stainless steel, then welded the two full circles and two semi-circles.

He took the welds down with a 5 inch grinder, then used a polifan disc to smooth them out. He created the linished look with Poly-PTX flap wheels and used a 9 inch, 100 grit sanding disk on the larger surfaces.

Rings of Saturn was commissioned through the Heide Foundation, with support from Lindsay and Paula Fox, and sits in Heide’s Sir Rupert Hamer Garden.

Inge King will hold an exhibition of mostly stainless steel works at Australian Galleries, 35 Derby Street, Collingwood, Victoria in April-May 2008.  Visit their website for more information.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 42.

Inge King, Rings of Saturn 2005-2006
Heide Museum of Modern Art Collection
Commissioned through the Heide Foundation with significant assistance from Lindsay and Paula Fox 2005
Photographer: John Gollings 2007, 2006
Copyright: Inge King & John Gollings


Posted 1 July 2007

An exhibition showcasing the use of stainless steel in an artistic sense will, for the first time ever, coincide with ASSDA’s annual conference in October.

Warrick Timmins - HouseboatSponsored by ASSDA member ELG and presented in partnership with Cooks Hill Galleries, the exhibition entitled Stainless Evolution, will be on display in the main auditorium at the PacRim 2007 Conference in Newcastle this October.  The pieces created will use various types of stainless steel, for the exclusive viewing of PacRim delegates.

timminsartWarrick Timmins of Newcastle is one such artist who has used stainless steel in his pieces to depict his love of water.  Warrick says he enjoys designing forms that challenge his skills and pushes the dimensions of the materials he uses.

He says he uses stainless steel for its ‘strength, beauty and reflective qualities’.

Following on from the conference, the art exhibiition will be moved to Cooks Hill Gallleries in Newcastle, under the direction of Mr Mark Widdup.

Images are pieces by Warrick Timmins that were included in the exhibition.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 40.


Posted 1 July 2007

The work of Anna Eggert is not new to ASSDA, or to those familiar with the 2005 Reference Manual where her pieces entitled “Belinda’s dress” featured on the cover.

anneeggertTwo years on, Anna’s love of stainless steel continues, as she begins work on a new project which has seen her nominated for the 2007 McClelland Award.

The work, which will be put forward for a chance at the $100,000 prize money, is similar to that shown, and again uses stainless steel mesh.

“Mesmerized” is an eight piece artwork  continuing an investigation into the female identity.  In particular, Anna explores the inherent nature of those outside the Muslim religion, who become ‘mesmerized’ by their own curiosity of a women dressed in hijab.

The production of the pieces begin with a roll of stainless steel mesh.  The material is rolled out and a pattern is penned before cutting with a nibble.

All pieces are made with grade 316. The base layer of the pieces use quite a coarse stainless steel with a 1.0mm aperture x 0.56mm wire diameter (known as 16/24). A softer layer is then used on top, with a mesh known as bolding cloth which has an aperture of 710 micron and wire diameter of 0.20mm.

Anna says all her stainless steel mesh is supplied by Metal Mesh in Sydney who have been very supportive of her work. Various pieces of Anna’s repertoire of work will be displayed in NSW, Canberra and Noosa in the coming months, with the winner of the McClelland Award to be announced in November.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 40

Stainless style and sunscreen

Form and function have long been the essence of good design, which is why the transformation of this Canberra building is such a success.

canberrabuildingASSDA member and Accredited Fabricator Interspace Manufacturing Pty Ltd was commissioned to design and fabricate screens to update the building aesthetically, as well as provide the workers inside the building with protection from the sun.

Interspace Managing Director Jorgen Hansen said the unique design of the mesh transformed the facade of an ordinary building into an interesting piece of architecture.

“Not only is the design aesthetic, but the screen helps reflect a percentage of the sun’s rays from entering the office windows,” Mr Hansen said.

“Woven wire mesh is a versatile product and can be used in a number of different applications, such as security, sunscreening, cladding, partitions, balustrades, ceiling panels and facades, as seen in our Canberra project.”

The final project, which cost $95,000, incorporated 321 woven mesh panels in grade 304 stainless steel measuring approximately 540mm x 1900mm each. The mesh was supplied by ASSDA member Metal Mesh from Terrey Hills, NSW.

Mr Hansen said stainless steel was used for the project because of its longevity in external environments and the minimal maintenance required to keep it looking brand new.

“Stainless steel has a durability that will last the lifetime of the building and, with periodic washing, its appearance will be retained, often with no other maintenance necessary - an important and cost-effective factor.”

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 41.

Stainless cleans up university grounds

The thought of public rubbish bins usually attracts images of black smelly wheelie bins with broken lids and flies.  However, if you walked through the University of Queensland in Brisbane’s St Lucia, you would be greeted, instead, with clean stainless steel and lovely bright colours.

wheeliebins

The installation of between 30-50 new double-bin enclosures has added splashes of colour and flair to the university grounds.  Designers Street and Garden Furniture Co enlisted the services of long time contractors and ASSDA Accredited Fabricators Rocklea Pressed Metal to manufacture the pieces.

Featuring laser cut patterns, bright colour spray painting (to distinguish general rubbish from recycling) and a unique shape, the bins were designed with the surrounding art deco buildings in mind.

Street and Garden Furniture Co Director David Shaw says he often uses stainless steel for outdoor use because of its robustness and he found it particularly useful for the bins.

He says students tended to decorate large surface areas with posters, so using stainless steel meant they could be easily cleaned.

“Much of the damage is often caused by people emptying the bins,” Mr Shaw also says. “So we tried to design them to make them easily accessible.  If the surface gets damaged, they can be simply re-surfaced.”

Manufacture of the bins involved 12.24 square metres of 1.6mm grade 304 sheet with a number 4 finish and 18 lineal metres of 25 x 1.6mm grade 304 square tube. A considerable amount of laser cutting was done to adopt the academic shield and to break the large surface area with an aesthetic pattern.  A floating top was also designed to minimise the dominance of the wheelie bin size and to provide a shield against weather.

The designs were done by Street and Garden Furniture Co and then sent to Rocklea Pressed Metal as a CAD file.
David Shaw says his longstanding relationship with Rocklea Pressed Metal has been built through a history of confidence and delivery.

“An awful lot of the things we do, those guys are involved in,” he says.  “I am totally confident they’ll provide me with what I’ve drawn.”

The University of Queensland project is a longstanding one, dating back to 1997.  The project also incorporates the installation of light poles, tree grates, signage and seats, much of which Rocklea Pressed Metal has contributed to.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 42.

Subwharfyen Steels Your Imagination

A childhood spent yacht racing was Newcastle artist Braddon Snape’s inspiration for his intriguing new piece entitled The SubWharfyen at Darling Harbour.

“I was always surrounded by beautifully machined or crafted stainless steel rigging and equipment,” he said. So when Sydney Wharf commissioned Mr Snape to create a large-scale work depicting the relationship between people and the sea, stainless steel seemed like a natural choice.

Mr Snape’s experience in working with hardy materials and a highly evolved visual language proved a winning combination. The finished product is a great success as a premium contemporary development for the area.

Sydney Wharf recognised the potential for stainless steel to meet the requirements of the project for both aesthetics and durability.

“The use of stainless steel relates to its surroundings on both a conceptual and material level,” Sydney Wharf’s Shaun Farren said. “It has a connection with the maritime context and is durable in a marine environment.”

ASSDA Accredited Fabricator Marko Stainless provided their fabrication services for the project, using 450 kilograms of laser cut 3mm sheet in grade 316 stainless steel to produce The SubWharfyen from a one-in-twenty wooden model. Three panels comprise the body, which were rolled to form the curved sides. The panels were TIG welded, and blades MIG welded after initial polishing. All welds were pickled, and the entire sculpture passivated after completion.

On Mr Snape’s specification, a minimum 320 grit finish was used for its satin-like quality. “The finish allows the sculpture to respond to the light and colour of its surrounding environment without being consumed by busy reflections,” Mr Snape said.

Mr Snape describes the sculpture as “a synthesis of my aesthetic, poetic, intellectual and practical response to the particular site and the surrounding locale”.

This articled featured in Australian Stainless Issue 44.

Standing the test of time

The $10 million stainless steel revamp of Melbourne’s Bourke Street Mall has certainly lived up to its original purpose, providing a durable, clean and simple linear theme.

In 2006, inspired by success stories of nearby stainless street furniture, the City of Melbourne council conducted a life cycle costing analysis – with astounding results.

City of Melbourne Industrial Designer Marika Mulqueen said stainless steel ensured low maintenance costs and design flexibility.

“Using stainless steel over powder coated steel significantly reduces ongoing maintenance costs. A comparison found that while stainless steel can initially cost more, over a 20 year period maintenance costs can be up to 50 per cent less than powder coated steel. Maintenance involves a once a year pressure clean instead of the need for regular repainting to deal with scratching and paint peeling,” she said.

“Scratches do not show up as easily because the furniture is brushed stainless steel and is not prone to fading,” she said.

MME provided smooth mechanical finishing which minimises dirt retention for optimum corrosion resistance.

The project included new seating, drinking fountains, recycle bins, banner poles and a new fit-out for the tram zone.

Stainless steel was chosen as, when the correct surface finish is applied, it is virtually maintenance free.

John Bainbridge of ASSDA member MME Surface Finishing presented the department with information on the value of considering the life cycle cost advantage of stainless steel and the importance of specifying the correct surface finish.

ASSDA member TRJ Engineering fabricated the commemorative totem poles. The poles use grade 316 stainless steel in a No.4 scratch finish. Each consisted of two pressed cylinders at the base of the pole which had L.E.D. lights mounted on both sides behind a glass facia.

The cylinders were formed in a CNC brake press which worked very well to prevent any surface roughness.

The last part of the project was completed in-house before installation and electro-polishing.

The Melbourne Technical Design Department has since recommended that all future street furniture commissioned by the council be stainless steel specified.

 

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 44, Spring 2008.

Photography courtesy of Andrew Curtis.


Posted 31st July 1993

A new product design company, KOZ Functional Art will shortly be launching a bath ware series called "Bath Art" made entirely from stainless steel

KOZ's mission is to design and manufacture distinctively Australian innovative domestic wares - "Functional Art". The name expresses our design commitment to quality and the integration of meaning, aesthetics and function. KOZ's research found that stainless steel is an ideal material for the Bath Art application because of its durability , low maintenance, design flexibility and ease of manufacture. The Bath Art range comprises four products - shower caddy, soap holder, toothbrush and tumbler stand and spare toilet roll holder.

Throughout development of the range KOZ has been determined to manufacture from stainless steel and do so in Australia in spite of much opinion from industry that this was not possible, on both counts.

A new firm with a long learning curve ahead, KOZ contacted the Australian Stainless Steel Development Association to find out how ASSDA could assist.

KOZ required manufacturers for its designs who could produce high quality wire and spinning fabrications from stainless steel in short runs in Brisbane. KOZ also required information on material supply for some illusive components.

ASSDA was able to draw on the experience and knowledge of members to provide lists of potential fabricators and an offer of introductions from which a fabricator has been found. ASSDA was also able to provide a list of materials and component suppliers both from within and without the Association where necessary. The advice was prompt and enabled KOZ to get on with the manufacturing business. Of great surprise was that the entire process could be achieved in Brisbane.

The free form design of Bath Art products requires a different aptitude than is usual for traditional wire work and the results of product development have been pleasing for KOZ and we believe for the fabricator as well. All the products have been fabricated from type 304 stainless steel wire in gauges ranging from 1mm to 6mm. Primarily joining has been achieved by resistance welding, through a small amount of TIG welding is also incorporated. Following fabrication the products are electropolished to a bright chrome-like finish.

KOZ has tested products for saleability in pilot arrangements with local retailers. This has resulted in orders beyond KOZ's current ability to produce, a situation rapidly being addressed.

For KOZ and Bath Art the future looks promising.

The Australian Stainless Steel Development Association has provided a short-cut along the learning curve for KOZ, enabling our designs to be rapidly placed in production with a minimum of expenditure and heart-ache. For many designers the gap between good design and an excellent product is wide. The service provided by ASSDA has been invaluable in helping KOZ bridge the gap.

Roger Simpson of the Design Institute of Australia stated earlier this year that only those Australian manufacturers with forward thinking that focus on the longer term, develop new strategies and high quality products who will effectively compete in the world market and succeed in the 1990's. I am happy to be working with some of them. I firmly believe that organisations like ASSDA are essential in fostering and facilitating the development of such companies within the stainless steel industry.

Written by Julia Lembryk, Designer, KOZ Functional Art.
This article featured in Australian Stainless Magazine - Issue 1, July 1993.

Showcasing motorcycle champions with stainless

The Ducati Sydney Racing Team have many reasons to be proud after Twin Cylinder motorcycle rider, Craig McMartin, won the 2004 Australian Pro-Twins Championship.

McMartin, who also won the championship in 2001 and 2002, rode his Ducati Sydney 999S to his third victory at the final round held in September 2004 at Phillip Island, Victoria.

The success of McMartin and fellow Ducati riders in the Championship also contributed to the Ducati team winning the fourth successive Manufacturers Championship.

Every Championship win gives Ducati the edge over other motorcycle manufacturers as they compete for the attention of enthusiasts seeking to purchase their next motorcycle.

To showcase the achievements of Craig McMartin and the Ducati Sydney Racing Team, team sponsor and ASSDA member, Interspace Manufacturing, designed a range of displays.

In addition to custom designed large banners and free standing corporate signage, the Ducati displays included merchandising stands and motorcycle platforms.

The Sydney-based company designs, develops, prototypes, tests, manufactures and supplies all types of architectural products where quality and design is important.

Design products include everything from smart fixing systems, furniture, storage, display, balustrading, glass patch fittings and feature walls, to larger building projects with stainless steel wire mesh for ceilings and interior and exterior walls.

This article was featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 32, Winter 2005.