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Tourists Supported by Stainless

Stainless steel spiral handrails provide a stunning support for climbers of Perth's new Bell Tower complex.

Grade 316 stainless steel tube was used to construct handrails for an internal spiral staircase and for an observation platform on the building's sixth floor.

170 metres of tube was used for the staircase, which was spiralled and fixed to the mild steel structure of the building. Washers and neoprene gaskets were used to separate the stainless steel from the mild steel, avoiding corrosion issues caused by dissimilar metal contact.

The handrails were fabricated by Tubelok Metals Australia in their Cannington (Western Australia) workshop and brought into the Bell Tower in six metre lengths.

Handrails on the sixth floor observation platform were secured to the structure with patch fittings through toughened glass, with 40 metres of stainless steel pipe used in total.

All handrail for the project was polished to a AWBP finish (as welded buff polished)_ Stainless steel for the project was supplied by ASSDA member Austral Wright Metals.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 18, May 2001.

Style + Strength

The superior strength of stainless steel has long made it the material of choice for prison toilet facilities. Innovative styling has now opened up a new market in public restrooms. Increasingly, venues are turning to stainless steel to make their facilities safer and reduce costs in the long term. 

Vandalism in public facilities is a widespread occurrence, with some pub and club owners forced to replace a toilet every few weeks. While the initial outlay may be higher for stainless fittings, the cost of replacing and installing a ceramic pan can be recouped after just one instance of vandalism. Unbreakable stainless steel also eliminates the risk of injury from sharp ceramic shards and the inconvenience of effluent overflow.

Stylish designs mean that aesthetics aren't sacrificed for practicality. Martin O’Brien, General Manager of the recently refurbished QA Hotel in Brisbane’s Teneriffe, says stainless steel was the logical choice because it’s "tough as teeth, durable and looks good. Stainless steel was the best way to go - its clean lines never go out of date." As part of a total makeover, the QA replaced ceramic tiles and fittings with stainless steel. O’Brien says vandalism in pubs is a big issue, with "punters" taking out their frustrations in the bathrooms and causing a lot of damage to conventional fittings.

ELEGANT AND FUNCTIONAL
Metal, timber and black are the predominant themes in the $3 million refurbishment of the 120-year-old Regatta Hotel, overlooking the Brisbane River. Conceived by owner-developer Steve Hammond, the renovation juxtaposes high tech and rustic, with gleaming metal and glass surfaces set against timber frames and sandblasted brick walls. The metallic theme continues outside with stainless steel topped café tables on the pavement and verandahs, and aluminium louvres replacing traditional lattice.

Stainless steel is integral to the washroom design, combining clean, minimalist lines with durability, vandal-resistance and minimum maintenance. Push pad controls replace vulnerable taps, while moulded stainless steel pans with in-wall slimline cisterns and push pad flush eliminate other targets for vandals. Stainless steel is used for mirrors, air-towels, soap and toilet paper dispensers.

Stainless steel fabricator Stoddart, who drew on the resources of ASSDA to develop a commercial product range, says their pans are often specified as part of a suite to fit in with a high-tech, architectural look. This project used Stoddart's standard shrouded toilet made from satin finished, 316 stainless to withstand heavy duty cleaning products. A pin inside the bowl prevents objects like wine glasses being flushed into the plumbing. The flat plate design of the rim flush makes the toilet contraband-proof and the unit has the advantage of being able to be fixed onto a wall from the inside.

Stainless steel features heavily elsewhere in the bar frames and counters and in a microbrewery. Three 2 000 litre stainless steel tanks with decorative copper cladding have been incorporated into the design of the downstairs bar. The beer is piped to fermentation tanks in the upstairs bar, which form a backdrop to the dancefloor. Apart from providing a theming enhancement to a predominantly beer pub, the installation of a microbrewery was a commercial decision in response to a growing demand for boutique and specialty beers, says project manager Rob Forbes.

BEACHFRONTS AND PARKS
Local authorities present another significant market for stainless steel amenities. Gold Coast City Council, which for some years has had a policy of replacing vandalised ceramic toilets with stainless steel ones, is now installing stainless steel pans in all new public convenience blocks. To improve safety, the Council is also considering installing stainless steel woven security mesh near the entrance of public toilets. The one-way screen allows people to see if is there is a threat outside the building before exiting.

STYLISH STAINLESS SHOWERS
In conjunction with Stoddart, Gold Coast City Council is developing a prototype stainless steel shower to eliminate the corrosion problems of beachside installation. Ian Munro, Supervisor in the Council’s Building & Maintenance section, says the project has attracted interest from other councils on the coast. Seven showers are currently being tested. ASSDA member Stoddart has also manufactured stainless steel street furniture for Casuarina Beach on the Tweed Coast in northern NSW including beach-themed showers in 316 stainless. These are designed to be vandal and weather resistant and feature automatic water cut-off to prevent wastage.

Image on left: Casuarina Beach 316 stainless surfboard shower. Design by Hutton-Harris. Fabrication by Stoddart.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 20, February 2002.

New Technology for Design Excellence

The overwhelming response from the architecture community to our earlier article on precision folding of stainless steel sheet using vee-cutting technology has prompted a more in-depth look at the process. 

Thanks to vee-cut technology, stainless steel sheet can be formed into angles as precise as those obtained by extrusion. This technology is now being carried out in Sydney, allowing the local manufacture of a whole range of stainless steel architectural products. The technique is particularly suited to elements such as door fronts, window frames, shopfronts, showcases, elevator doors as well as all forms of cladding.

In a completely new method of manufacture, vee-cutting can also be used to make flat products such as tread plates for lifts and escalators by removing strips of material to the required width and depth.

CLEAN LINES COMPLEMENT SPECIAL FINISHES
Ordinary bends made on a brake press typically produce a corner radius twice the thickness of the sheet, resulting in a finished product with soft, blurred lines. But with the introduction to Australia of vee-cut technology, it is now possible to produce stainless steel with corners as precise as an extruded angle, such as those found on aluminium window frames.

The method is particularly useful when working with textured and patterned stainless sheet. Such finishes are distorted by the traditional bending method. Using the vee-cut machine, the feature finish is preserved without loss of quality. This makes it the manufacturing method of choice for items such as bar fronts, display cases, door furnishings and a myriad of other uses where appearance counts.

THE VEE-CUTTING PROCESS
The machine cuts a continuous vee-shaped notch in the sheet using a series of five tools, which make repeated passes across the surface. The number of passes required varies depending on the thickness of the metal; generally three or four are needed, but up to 15 can be required for thicker product.

The machine can handle thicknesses in the range of 0.6mm to 6.0mm and is capable of cutting to a minimum depth of 0.4mm and processing sheet up to 4m in length. The sheet is then folded along the groove in a brake press. The depth of the groove can be set for acute angles down to 15°.

When used for cladding, up to 70% of the thickness of the sheet can be removed; however, care needs to be taken not to weaken structural components by removing too much of the thickness. One option is to remove material to obtain a tight corner and then stitch weld to restore strength – it is a matter of weighing up cost and other considerations.

A TYPICAL APPLICATION - ENTRANCE DOORS
An example of the finish available can be seen in the revolving doors of the McKell Building in Sydney (pictured). Byrnes Entrance Technology Pty Ltd (BET) worked with ASSDA member the Townsend Group to produce profiles and folded panel sections to clad the central steel and aluminium core of the triple door. The final effect is the appearance of a solid, triangular-shaped central column with lightly inward-curving sides.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 22, September 2002.

Sheer Delight

Stainless Steel Mesh

Woven metal fabrics are a popular architectural product in Europe, where stainless steel mesh is used for a high-level finish in many internal and external settings, such as wall and ceiling panelling, space dividers, external cladding and facades.

Now Sydney firm Interspace Manufacturing Pty Ltd is making and installing woven stainless steel wire mesh screens using metal fabrics from iO Metal Fabrics Pty Ltd, a German firm with an Australian presence and a member of ASSDA.

ASSDA member Interspace has been designing and manufacturing store fittings and custom fixtures for displays and exhibitions since 1970. The firm began utilising stainless steel mesh two years ago and has produced partitions for a number of interiors, including the AMP Building in Sydney and the office of medical supply firm B. Braun, designed by Leffler Simes Architects. Another project is Space 207 in St Leonards, Sydney, which is being billed as "the North Shore's finest office building, so advanced it is destined to lead the way in business premises for a long time to come." The designers of Space 207 set out to create an environment representing "style, sophistication and elegance" and chose stainless steel mesh to complement the building's hi-tech, ultra-modern decor.

Woven stainless steel fabrics are versatile and reliable. Made from corrosion-resistant grade 316 stainless, they are equally at home in hostile external locations requiring stainless steel's hard-wearing capability and in internal spaces where aesthetic values come to the fore. They can be put to a variety of uses, including partitions, wall and ceiling cladding, awnings and sunscreens. In Germany they are also employed in roadside noise reduction barriers.

Stainless mesh is lightweight but strong and it is extremely resilient when subjected to environmental threats such as heavy weather, fire and chemicals.

Like textiles generally, metal fabrics are woven on a loom, producing an attractive array of patterns and textures in a varying degrees of weight and flexibility.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 23, December 2002.

Large tube now made in Australia

The Australian construction and food processing sectors can specify stainless steel tube in large sizes with confidence in its quality and timely delivery, now that local production has commenced at a Victorian plant.

Manufacturing by an Australian firm will also make it easier for specificiers to communicate their special requirements.

Stainless Tube Mills' special purpose factory in Melbourne’s outer east is producing longitudinally welded tube in diameters up to 300mm and wall thicknesses up to 8mm – the largest seamwelded stainless steel tube available in Australia. Tube in this size range has always been imported.

The recently commissioned draw mill, designed in house by ASSDA member STM in conjunction with CSIRO, joins twelve other mills on site which produce welded tube up to 101.6mm outside diameter.

While a conventional mill uses a drive mechanism to feed the strip through the mill and produce welded tube, in the draw mill strip (1) is drawn through the mill with the forming rolls idling (2 & 3). This has the effect of producing a tube with minimal roll forming marks, as well as precise tolerances. The internal weld bead (4) is rolled to merge with the parent metal producing a smooth bore. Externally, the polished finish renders the seam all but invisible.

The smooth interior finish means tube produced on the draw mill is ideal for transfer of processing fluids, particularly food products, where the clean internal bore is mandatory.

Large diameter tube is also finding application architecturally for balustrades, barriers and structural column formers. As formers they make an attractive alternative to brick or concrete,
delivering a superlative appearance and impressive structural strength, which can be further bolstered by filling with concrete. STM used 300mm columns in T304 alloy to dramatically enhance its own office façade (left).

The draw mill has only been in operation commercially for a short time, however STM reports there has already been considerable demand. The firm's future plans include production of heavy walled large diameter sectional tubes for architectural applications.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 21 - June 2002.

Stainless across a cultural spectrum

Melbourne's public life is populated with unique, strong and take-as-you-find personalities. Its culture – from high to mass – is influenced by figures like Jeff Kennett and Sam Newman, who shape Melbourne's view of itself and its environment.

While the former Premier's impact on the Victorian capital has been comprehensive, the refurbishment of Brighton Sea Baths as an upscale nightspot part-owned by Mr Newman has contributed a smaller scale landmark which is just as likely to provide visitors (male ones, anyway) with a memorable impression of the city.

The retired Geelong player and AFL Footy Show co-host, well-known in Melbourne for his flamboyant lifestyle, including a 5m high mural of pop icon Pamela Anderson at his Brighton home, came up with a quirky idea for the urinal: a built-in wide-screen TV (main image).

ASSDA member Britex, working with Buxton Constructions' Adrian Seymour and architects McGauran Soon Pty Ltd, were able to deliver the goods thanks to the versatility of stainless steel.

Melbourne's CBD has undergone a transformation in recent years, and everywhere stainless steel is playing a significant role. It’s proving its durability and appeal in major public facilities, such as Colonial Stadium (urinals) and Vodafone Arena (food preparation areas), both venues which showcase the city’s top sports events and attract many international visitors. The facilities must perform under the pressure of large crowds and yet look good.

Stainless steel fulfills these requirements here as it does at the Melbourne Convention Centre. The Centre, one of the country’s premier sites for international events, makes the most of its riverside location, with floor to ceiling windows framing views of the Yarra and one of Melbourne's best-known attractions, the Polly Woodside. Stainless steel benches in the foyer are in keeping with the clean lines and open spaces (see image, right).

Stainless works equally well in boutique refurbishments, such as Brighton Sea Baths and Retreat on Spring, an upmarket health resort tucked away near Melbourne’s gracious old Parliament buildings. The design language of Retreat on Spring is quiet, peaceful, harmonious.

Blond, polished floorboards, bamboo and stone set a tranquil tone. Stainless steel slips easily into this combination of natural elements and muted colours, while providing a practical surface in the health bar area and for the vanities in the individual therapy rooms.

From the intimate setting of Retreat on Spring to the high-traffic amenities at the city’s massive sports arenas, stainless steel is perfectly at home, providing both understated elegance and rugged performance.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 21 - June 2002.

Walsh Bay

A Style Statement in Stainless

The transformation of Sydney's Walsh Bay from derelict wharves and sheds into a prestigious residential complex, complete with cultural, retail and commercial facilities, provides a stage for Australian innovation in design and technology, including some of the finest examples of stainless steel structural and architectural applications.

Located amid Sydney's landmarks -the Opera House, Circular Quay, The Rocks and Sydney Harbour Bridge -the Walsh Bay Precinct is said to be "the most significant urban renewal of heritage Sydney to be undertaken for many years."

According to developers Walsh Bay Partnership (WBP), a joint venture project between Mirvac and Transfield, "the redevelopment captures an exceptional balance between Walsh Bay's rich heritage, sympathetic contemporary design, and the vision to revitalise Walsh Bay as Australia's finest new residential address."

The development features 350 luxury apartments, 140 of them located on Pier 6f7, one of the five "finger wharves" constructed between 1906 and 1922 to serve Sydney's expanding commercial shipping activity. But the area's history goes back much further: Walsh Bay was one of Sydney's first industrial ports, dating back to 1820. Like many other city ports around the world, Walsh Bay ceased operations in the '70s and by the late '90s much of the area was unused and neglected.

 

New Technology Preserves Authentic Feel
WBP was formed in '97 to undertake restoration, with an emphasis on conservation strategies such as salvaging the old hardwood timbers and historical artefacts. Over 80% of the original buildings are being retained and the style of new construction is required to evoke and interpret Walsh Bay's rich heritage. Preserving its historic appeal, unique operable louvres which mimic the original timber planks face the 200m long refurbished pier. These are made from aluminium and supported by grade 316 stainless steel brackets. The louvres pivot on stainless steel supports, allowing them to withstand winds up to 130krnlh. As a safety measure, they close automatically if the weather worsens. They were designed by Architectural Glass Projects Pty Ltd, a Sydney firm which specialises in building components such as glass facades, operable louvres, balustrading and specialised glazing.

 

Stainless to Resist Sea Spray
To take best advantage of its Sydney Harbour location, a marina with private boat moorings accessible from ground-level apartments runs along both sides of the pier and features     stainless steel steps, gates and balustrades.

Starting with the right materials and selecting the most appropriate surface finish are key factors for ensuring the quality and life-cycle of the finished project, particularly in harsh marine environments. A surface roughness (Ra) under O.SJ.Jm using 320 grit abrasives was specified for the stainless steel used in this project. Mechanical grinding was followed by electropolishing, a chemical process which smooths and levels the surface, to produce the best protection against tea staining and contamination.

Surface treatments were carried out by two ASSDA members, MME Surface Finishing and Metaglo Pty Ltd. A large proportion of the stainless steel material used was imported large extruded T and 'L' sections up to 150mm deep. MME, which has the capacity to process elements up to 6.5m long by either mechanical means or electropolishing, modified machines and developed new techniques to produce a consistent O.SJ.Jm finish throughout. Components were returned to MME after fabrication for immersion pickling and electropolishing.

An Asset for Sydney
The revitalised Walsh Bay precinct is set to become an attraction for residents and visitors when it opens next year. As well as offices and apartments, the development includes a new cultural centre, an 850 seat theatre, parks, restored bridges and walkways. A promenade will link Walsh Bay to The Rocks and Circular Quay, opening up the foreshore to the public for the first time in over a century.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 23, December 2002.

Stainless delivers the wow factor

A decor has to be unique to stand out among the trendy cafes and nightclubs in Park Road, Milton, one of Brisbane’s most fashionable locations, and it certainly has to possess the wow factor to compete with the multitude of sensory experiences which greet clubbers out to see the latest bands and DJs.

A unique interior, using stainless steel, which would wow the patrons, was the brief SOBAR NightClub owner Darren Perris gave Brisbane fabricator Klein Architectural, along with just 48 hours for concept, design and installation before opening night.

The mission was accomplished with patterned stainless surfaces to capitalise on the venue’s electric blue lighting and generate myriad shifting reflections, creating the perfect high-energy setting for the pounding beats and sinuous rhythms of the nightclub scene.

Working within a budget of around $8,000, Klein used 13 sheets of 0.9mm thick, grade 304 stainless with a 2B finish, supplied by ASSDA member Fagersta Steels, to line the bulkhead and square columns of the bar area. This was set off with 65mm round mirror polished tube at the rear of the bulkhead.

Following straightforward fabrication using glue and screwed fixings for the skinning, a heavy metal look was achieved by gluing the heads of cup bolts over counter-sunk screws.

Stainless panels on the columns were linished horizontally in a heavy grain and customised patterning was applied to the stainless steel skins of external and interior bulkheads and corners of the columns.

The end result is a shining example of stainless steel being used artistically and functionally without compromising either purpose.

This article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 24 - March 2003.

Ingenious Design Serves Patrons Well

Lightweight stainless steel construction has allowed the proprietor of a Tasmanian cafe to expand operations without building new brick and mortar premises.

Page’s of the Mall is a stainless steel satellite to an existing cafe located in the busy Launceston Mall. Custom built for the site, it has proved popular and profitable since opening shortly before Christmas 2002.

The client, Mark Page, approached Launceston fabricator FAME Foley Industries with a particular brief: to construct a portable cafe catering to both take-away and sit-down trade which met standard refrigeration, food preparation and hygiene requirements. The unit had to conform to local Council guidelines and match the awnings recently installed in the Mall.

PACK UP AND MOVE

The challenge was to produce a design measuring just 2m high by 1.9m wide and 5.5m long to be wheeled into Page’s main shop at night.

The design evolved over the course of a year with input from a Launceston Council architect and took two months to build. The unit unpacks to a height of 2.5m when the roof is unfolded forming wing-like canopies above the serving areas, and the sides open out to 2.8m in width.

Concealed wheels at one end allow the unit to be moved using an electric pallet lifter. It is positioned over a pit with access via a hatch to water, power and drainage.

A seating area is enclosed by stainless steel barriers clad with laminex signs arranged in a zig zag shape for strength. These are also completely portable and have lockable castors.

Inside the cafe, which has garnered the nickname ‘coffee tram’, stainless steel pie heaters, fridges and washing facilities are built in as integral parts of the unit. Fully enclosed stainless steel trolleys are used to transport supplies from the main cafe.

PRACTICAL AND ECONOMICAL

Stainless steel was chosen for the project both for its clean style and for its appropriateness to the design and usage. The construction is simultaneously lightweight and strong, allowing it to be wheeled around daily and to withstand the mall traffic. Hygiene is readily maintained with easy to clean food preparation surfaces.

Most of the unit, including framework, walls, benches and supports are made from grade 304 stainless while grade 316 is used for the roof as it is exposed to the weather. The fridges, part of Foley’s range of kitchen and bathroom ware, are made from grade 430. Stainless steel was supplied by ASSDA member Atlas Steels.

Costs compare favourably with erecting a permanent building, at around $100,000 to construct and fit out, and the concept can be adapted to suit other locations.

The article featured in Australian Stainless Issue 24 - March 2003


Posted 1 July 2003

The long-term cost effectiveness of stainless steel makes it a worthwhile proposition even though the initial outlay can be significant. The construction industry is realising that choosing a cheaper, but less durable material can be a false economy.

Eventually repairs need to be made and this can be at considerable expense. Further, there are likely to be logistical problems absent from the initial construction which add to the cost.

For example, when 101 Collins Street – a prestigious Melbourne high-rise office building – was completed twelve years ago, its two 80,000 litre fire water storage tanks were constructed out of bolted steel with a nylon-coated internal surface. Over time the coating had pitted and the steel was corroding, raising concerns about the future reliability of the system.

It was decided that replacement tanks should be fabricated from 4mm thick 316 stainless steel for long-term reliability.

Access was limited because the tanks had been placed in position with the attendant pumps and fire services system plumbing installed beneath them. In fact, a hatch in the floor above the tanks measuring just under a metre square was the only way in and out of the area.

ASSDA member, J Furphy & Sons of Shepparton, Victoria was the successful tenderer for the construction and installation of the new tanks.

The 7.4m long x 2.4m wide x 4.8m deep tanks were fabricated in individual panels, 4.8m x 900mm. With a hoist assembly above, the panels were lowered into position through the hatch and welded in situ. Other challenges to be overcome were creating adequate occupational health and safety conditions and providing welding power and services to the site.

The final step in the project was in situ hydrostatic testing for leaks which proved successful.

The owners of 101 Collins Street can now look forward to many years of worry-free service performance.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 25, July 2003.

Specifying Stainless for Suncorp Stadium

PDT Architects, Brisbane in association with HOK Sport, Venue and Event designed and documented the $280m Suncorp Stadium for the Queensland Government.

"It is the top grade material and that's what we wanted for the stadium...

When you take that the client is the people of Queensland, they expect the best to go into the stadium.

If they're paying $280 million for a stadium they want the thing to last and stainless will give you that longevity."

 

Director, John Brown of PDT Architects described the pros and cons of specifying stainless steel for the redevelopment of Lang Park (Suncorp Stadium).

Ticket Counters
When PDT Architects expressed concerns by Ticketek staff that stainless steel ticket counters would be too glary, ASSDA provided the necessary technical assistance required and prevented a switch to timber material.

JB: The client talked about changing from stainless to timber because Ticketek and others had commented that stainless steel would be too glary.

We found that we could use a brushed finish which wouldn’t throw up too much glare and we also did some sun shade diagrams and all sorts of diagrams to make sure the sun wasn’t hitting the ticket counters.

Full Stainless: Commercial Kitchens
JB: It was always going to be stainless steel, mainly because of the health reasons ... but also for cleaniness and ease of cleaning.

All the commercial kitchens at the stadium have them. All the finishing kitchens, all the food outlets, beverage and of course the main kitchen. All the food is prepared in that kitchen and taken up through the service lifts into the finishing kitchens, warming kitchens and then out into the public.

Stainless Wire Rope for Visibility
PDT Architects has recommended replacing the stadium’s flat bar rails with stainless steel wire rope to improve visibility.

JB: We've been able to convince the State Government code people that we can take a lot of the galvanising rails out and put in stainless steel wire rope which would give a better view.

We’ve put in a report to the Government whereby we can cut out a lot of these flat bars and put in stainless steel wire rope through them which will just open the whole place up.

Stadium Stainless Statistics
ASSDA member Fagersta supplied 60 tonnes of stainless steel coil of various widths and thicknesses to ASSDA member Tom Stoddart. A further 10 tonnes of stainless steel was supplied to Eziform for gutters and box gutters.

Tom Stoddart produced works at a cost of $11 million and approximately 50,000 man hours including full kitchen and bar fitouts, refrigeration units, cash register stations balustrading and some food service equipment.

Fagersta was also the main supplier of stainless steel for Colonial Stadium in Melbourne and Telstra Stadium in Sydney.

The Post Game Wrap-Up
JB: Firstly, it satisfied us as far as an architectural feature went, it satisfied us as far as life cycle went and most certainly it then satisfied us as far as safety issues went.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 26, November 2003.

Versatile Style with Stainless Decorative Tiles

A revolution is about to take place in the tiling industry with the introduction of stainless steel decorative tiles with a versatile design that will add style to any kitchen, bathroom, restaurant, bar and even as a feature wall.

There are many benefits to using stainless steel tiles. The tiles cannot burn or crack, graffiti can be easily removed, will not rust and is a stylish upgrade to the standard one piece splashbacks.

Available from Futura Tiles (Border Sheetmetal), the tiles are available in a wide variety of sizes, patterns, finishes and grades. Size ranges include: 65 x 290mm freeze, 290 x 290mm tile, 390 x 390mm tile.

Runaway Bay Designer Builder, Kerri Phillips, was so happy with the product that he installed the stainless tiles in his own kitchen and found cutting the tiles no problem at all.

"They provide you with special blades. It's a delicate operation, as long as you're careful it's fine," says Phillips.

ASSDA major sponsor, Fagersta Steels, supplies grade 304 stainless and patterned sheet from ASSDA member, Rimex Metals to Futura Tiles (Border Sheetmetal) to produce the tiles.

The tiles are also available in various Rimex patterns and finishes including the standard brush finish, 5WL and 6WL surface finishes.

Manufactured from grade 304 stainless as standard, the tiles are also available in grade 316 stainless for applications with a close proximity to marine environments.

Installing stainless steel tiles
Stainless steel tiles are basically the same as laying most floor and wall tiles. Cut tiles using similar ceramic grinding methods by using blades with 1mm steel cutting wheels.

Grouting
When grouting, apply grout to tiles leaving the protective film covering on the face of the tile. Use only fine, sanitised water resistant grouts and do not apply sanded or abrasive grouts. Remove excess grout with a clean sponge leaving a smooth grout line.

Removing film covering
Peel the protective film covering from the tiles, then with a clean sponge, remove any grout left behind from the edges of the covering. Leave approximately 30 minutes and dust off with a clean lint free cloth.

Protecting
After all dust film from the grouting has been removed apply a small amount of polishing oil to a clean rag and wipe with the grain of the tile to remove any excess oil. This will resist finger printing and water spotting and will enhance and protect the stainless steel surface.

Images courtesy of Karl Johnson, Futura Tiles (Border Sheetmetal).

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 29, September 2004.

Stainless Steel Enhances Hayman Island Views

North Queensland's Hayman Island Resort welcomes thousands of guests every year to the Great Barrier Reef island destination. Also attracted by the beauty of the resort, cockatoos have eaten away at the timber balcony railings and balustrades

 

To combat the work of the troublesome cockatoos, the resort management called for stainless steel to replace the timber railings and balustrades on the fifteen year old building.

ASSDA major sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied approximately 1,000 linear metres of grade 316 stainless steel including 76 x 42mm oval tube and 38mm diameter round tube in high polish to Mackay-based fabricator, Jeff Eales Sheetmetal for the project.

Stainless steel was used extensively for the balcony top rail and posts on all three levels of the pool wing accommodation block. Because many of the balconies are at the edge of the pool, oval profile tube was specified to prevent glasses or bottles being placed on the rail and then being bumped into the pool.

Also, to ensure guests receive uninterrupted ocean views, stainless steel wire rope was installed on each of the balustrades. This helped to eliminate the restricted views given by the previous timber material.

ASSDA member, Arcus Australia Pty Ltd supplied stainless steel wire for the balcony balustrades and ASSDA member Bridco supplied the wire fittings, turnbuckles and swages for the resort balustrading redevelopment.

Guests have commented on how the use of stainless steel complements the surroundings, improves the views and suits the building style.

Hayman Island Resort management are also impressed with the new stainless steel railing as it stops the bird problem, requires low maintenance and is easy to clean. All these qualities make the tropical ocean views much better.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Solving the puzzle with stainless mainline fittings

Choosing mainline fittings for irrigation applications can often seem like building a giant puzzle with elbows, tees, crosses and coupler sets - various fittings required to connect irrigation pipework together.

Pierce AustraliaHowever, Geoff Mellows from Yarrawonga Irrigation in Victoria may have solved the puzzle by using stainless steel mainline fittings - something that plastic fittings cannot yet match.

Poly, pvc and avs fittings are common materials in irrigation applications but because they are produced out of a mould, the combinations of size and outlet configuration are restricted.

Mellows said that by using stainless mainline fittings by ASSDA member, Pierce Australia, he can now “manipulate the angle, the shape, the variation and combination of outlets.“

The difference is simple. PVC and poly are bolted on, or welded and glued - making it difficult to change fittings”.

Stainless steel mainline fittings are the only rubber-ring jointed fittings available on the marketplace manufactured to the customers specific needs and can be fitted on any other combination because they are fabricated.

Stainless steel mainline fittings also provide flexibility of design in the angle of the fittings.

This also applies to the combination of outlets on those fittings and any other additional connections to that fitting.

With versatile stainless steel fittings, Mellows advice to customers is simple - “lay the pipe first and worry about the fittings later!”

This article featured in Australia Stainless Issue 28, May 2004.

Photos courtesy of Pierce Australia.

Stainless technology to remember war heroes

The Australian War Memorial in Hyde Park Corner, London stands as a symbol of freedom and an enduring spirit of strength.

To commemorate the men and women who fought and died for Australia alongside Britons in the two World Wars, Australian architectural firm Tonkin Zulaikha Greer and artist Janet Laurence designed the Memorial to reflect the sweep of the Australian landscape.

The result was a highly durable structure featuring a long, curved wave wall constructed out of West Australian green granite and supported by grade 316L stainless steel.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, and ASSDA members, M & S Stainless Supplies and Dalsteel Stainless supplied approximately 9000 kilos of stainless steel for the structure including 8mm plate, pipe, angles and 3mm sheet.

Grade 316L was specified for its corrosion resistance, particularly as the Memorial comprises a water feature that periodically cascades water across the wall to highlight the names of the hometowns of our soldiers.

Stainless steel was used primarily in the construction of stainless steel cradles which were fabricated in Australia, shipped, positioned and lifted into place to support the granite.

All welds were pickled and passivated to provide protection from the bromine and chlorine’s likely to be deposited on the frames from the water forms built into the Memorial.

Australian-based firm Design and Survey Neon (DSN) played a leading role in the design and manufacture of the supporting structure by using 3D modelling techniques.

The 3D modelling allowed the manufacture of components and assembly of the job to become a seamless process.

DSN modelled the granite wave wall and supporting cradles. The templates for the granite blocks and their fixings were then lifted from the model to enable the fixings to be pre-drilled prior to assembly.

The use of laser cutting and CNC technologies allowed DSN to fabricate to near machining tolerances. Laser etching of assembly notches were added for simple fabrication and installation.

Coordinates for supporting cradles from the model were used to determine correct on-site positioning via electronic theodolites.

The granite blocks were positioned with a 6mm gap vertically and horizontally to a tolerance of plus or minus 1mm. Precise accuracy was required to avoid accumulation of errors because of its wave like design.

Most of the components for the Memorial were imported from Australia. Water features and water effects were created by Waterforms International and all the stone work was assembled by Australians.

This article was featured in Australian Stainless Issue 28, May 2004.

Photos courtesy of Department of Veteran Affairs & Design and Survey Neon (DSN).

Main image: The Australian War Memorial 'Dedication Day Wreaths' placed in front of the curved granite wave wall. Photo courtesy of the Department of Veterans Affairs, copyright Commonwealth of Australia. Reproduced by permission.

Other images: 316 stainless steel cradles were lifted into place to support the granite blocks that form the wave wall.

Specifying Stainless Steel Pressure Piping for High Rise Buildings

Brisbane's tallest residential tower, The Aurora will stand 69 levels and will set an important precedent in the use of stainless steel pressure piping in high rise buildings when the Bovis Lend Lease project is completed in January 2006

 

Situated on the corner of Queen, Eagle and Wharf Streets in the Brisbane CBD, The Aurora utilises stainless steel pressure piping instead of conventional copper piping to ensure adequate water pressure for each of the 478 two and three bedroom apartments in the $250 million development.

ASSDA member, Blucher Australia, supplied approximately 250m x 108mm OD x 2mm Mapress tube and fittings, 90 degree and 45 degree bends, sockets, flange adaptors and tees in grade 316 stainless steel.

The Aurora project is different to conventional installations due to a single metered water supply being provided to a common pump set for both potable and fire fighting services.

The potable supply is then directly pumped to a reservoir at the top of the building, thus eliminating large costs of having to set aside floors for transfer tanks, pumps etc.

The fire service is branched off the potable supply immediately after the pump set and separated with a non-return valve allowing potable supply to continue the 70 storey rise to the top floor gravity feed tank. The potable water supply is to be an approved system and also able to withstand both the head pressure created by the vertical rise and pressure of emergency back up pumps in the event of a fire, which in this case is 2490 kPa.

The Mapress 316 Stainless Steel Press-Fit System was recommended by Mark Tapley of Plumbing Contractor Tapworth and Booth and specified by Hydramellenia, the subsidiary of Brisbane Hydraulic consultants Steve Paul & Partners. The system is able to withstand a high working pressure of up to 2600 kPa or 26 Bar. The system can be pressure tested up to 4000 kPa or 40 Bar.

Blucher Australia is presently proceeding with Standards Australia to obtain MP 52 certification for potable water supply and once obtained, the Mapress System will be the only stainless steel system, complete with tubes and fittings to achieve this certification.

The Mapress Stainless Steel Press-Fit System carries European pressure certification suitable for this particular application and the pressure rating for the system. No other stainless steel 'system' holds an MP 52 certification so the major change was acceptance by Brisbane City Council.

The Mapress Stainless Steel Press-Fit System was chosen for a combination of reasons including longevity, ease of installation and the system's ability to handle high pressure.

As a part of Blucher Australia's guarantee and OH&S requirements, Blucher Australia Technical Manager, Ian Johnson trained Project Manager Mark Tapley, Site Foreman Steve Woods and four other employees involved in The Aurora project in the use of the specialised Hydraulic Press-Fit tool and installation procedures.

Blucher Australia hold stock of all the stainless steel components required to do the installation. Delivery, in conjunction with the good organisation skills of Steve Wood of Tapworth and Booth, was straight forward.

Hydramellenia, the subsidiary of Steve Paul and Partners, is convinced of the benefits and is currently specifying the Mapress system for other projects. Blucher Australia has already supplied to the smaller Metropole Apartments Project, also in Brisbane, and has received inquiries from other consultants who have heard of this project.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Strata: A Majestic Streetscape in Stainless Steel

When South Australian developer, John Culshaw of Pentroth Pty Ltd proposed the design for the Majestic Roof Garden Hotel in Adelaide, the original proposal was for plain vertical bars for the car park grille of the Bent Street facade

Instead of surrendering to drab, pre-fab vertical bar grille designs, the developer actively sought a stylish alternative to the car park status quo. He commissioned artists Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell to create ‘Strata’, a stainless steel grille design that aesthetically showcases the hotel building and provides a ‘majestic streetscape’ experience for Bent Street pedestrians.

The artists’ intention was to excise the barrier that would be created by the vertical security bars, which were uninviting at street level. Taking this as their starting point, they researched the replacement of verticals with horizontals to create a calm but dynamic form.

Strata lines of sandstone (used on the Frome Street facade of the hotel), contour lines, isobars from weather charts and the winged roof line of the hotel all helped to drive the inspiration for the unique design. From these lines, the artists devised a series of twenty-two panels, in sets of one, two and three. Each set is a unique design so that the complexity of the concept was acknowledged.

The grille runs the length of the hotel on Bent Street, integrates with the building and the electrically operated entrance doors to the car park and storage areas of the hotel. The nature of these horizontal waving lines creates a dynamic effect because it seems that they swing in and out because of an optical illusion when viewed from an oblique angle. By day the sky and daylight are reflected from the satin surface of the steel and at night the street and hotel lighting is reflected.

The artists chose stainless steel for their artwork for several reasons. The material used had to be strong to fulfill the structural requirements of a security grille. The artists also required it to be aesthetically complementary to the contemporary and stylish design of the hotel.

The artists went through an intense design development stage to arrive at a formula for the curving lines that worked visually. Using this formula each panel was then drawn on a computer as vector lines, which were then converted to DXF files for driving the laser cutting equipment.

The panels were fabricated by Donato Steel Fabrications from 4mm thick 304 grade stainless steel sheet supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Sandvik Australia Pty Ltd. The artists’ designs were laser cut by Molnar Laser Cutting Services and then plate linished both sides to a number four satin finish. The sheets were then welded on the inside into the frames constructed of 38mm square stainless steel tube supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals.

The intention with these panels was to create a frame within a frame, the second frame being the walls and pillars of the hotel into which they were bolted. Therefore, the construction of the panels became part of the artwork.

The artists are very pleased with the result of the installation of ‘Strata’. Pentroth Pty Ltd and the Adelaide City Council are pleased that it adds to the ambience of Bent Street and creates a lively streetscape for pedestrians. Opposite the Hotel (and currently under construction) are Bent Street Apartments which will have retail facilities at ground floor level – ‘Strata’ provides a pleasant environment on the street which is also overlooked by the apartments above.

The stainless steel fabrication meets all the requirements of a car park security grille while providing a lively streetscape in the city. The artists believe this is a good example of creating something meaningful out of a necessity. That is, a car park grille that had to be created but it did not need to be ugly and aggressive for pedestrians at street level or for those living in the adjacent apartments.

Images courtesy of Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

Turning industrial systems into architectural features

A Queensland stainless steel fabrication company has successfully turned a product usually found in industrial environments into an architectural design feature that is gaining popularity on Australia’s east coast.

Stainless steel screens and grates have traditionally been used for filtering and cleaning in the mining, petrochemical, food processing and water treatment industries — applications where water transfer is required.

ASSDA member, Paige Stainless Fabrications has taken the grating concept further, beyond a simple drainage system, by using the product in architectural applications such as stair treads,  walkways and entry mats.

Paige Stainless Fabrications designs and manufactures ‘heel proof’ stainless steel products using close bar longitudinal / transverse grating.

One example of the product in action can be found at the Andrew ‘Boy’ Charlton Pool, Sydney, a popular swimming icon suspended over spectacular Woolloomooloo Bay.

Architects, Lippmann Associates, won a RAIA Architecture award in 2003 for public building design. As part of the project design, Lippmann Associates specified stainless steel stair treads and entry mats.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied grade 316 L stainless steel to the project because of it’s high corrosion resistance. The stainless steel product delivered the desired functional, environmental and aesthetic values that find appeal to architectural environments rather than traditional forms of drainage.

In further applications, the grade 304 stainless steel grating product has been used extensively for entry mats to the following buildings:

  • Ambros Building (corner Bent and Phillip Streets, Sydney).
  • AMP Building - Sydney
  • Customs House, Sydney
  • IBM Building, Sydney
  • National Australia Bank Administration, Melbourne Docklands

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 32, Winter 2005.

 

Specifying Stainless Steel for Luxury Beachside Homes

Stainless steel enjoys a strong and enduring reputation for visual appeal and structural integrity in a wide range of applications. This broad appeal has made stainless steel an ideal choice for value-adding luxury homes on Sydney’s northshore.

 

Spiral Staircase - Collaroy
One particular luxury home overlooking the beach at Collaroy was owned by former rugby league test captain Brad Fittler at the time. The home featured an external steel spiral staircase. However, its close proximity to the surf had caused the painted staircase to corrode in less than 12 months of installation.

Salt deposits had accumulated on the structure, causing the staircase to rapidly corrode in the harsh coastal environment.

Builder, Binet Homes commissioned ASSDA member, DJQ Industries to fabricate and install a stainless steel spiral staircase that could cope with the sustained salt exposure inherent with coastal applications.

DJQ Industries fabricated the new staircase out of grade 316 stainless steel supplied by ASSDA Major Sponsor, Fagersta Steels. The staircase was welded into sub-assemblies and electropolished by Regents Park Electroplating on completion of fabrication prior to installation on site.

The corrosion resistance of stainless steel in this environment and exposure to natural rain washing will mean this installation will have a long service life with minimal maintenance.

Pool with a View - Palm Beach
Substitute your morning coffee for a dip in this luxury home pool with a spectacular eye-opening view of northern Sydney’s beautiful Palm Beach.

ASSDA member DJQ Industries was contracted by Bellevarde Constructions to supply and install stainless steel balustrades, pool edging, fence and other household fittings.

ASSDA Major Sponsor Fagersta Steels supplied grade 316 stainless to DJQ Industries for the $200,000 project. The project was fabricated to meet all building and structural codes with finishes suitable for a marine environment.

The unique pool edge detail provides a less obtrusive mounting for the glass and stainless steel was used extensively in the construction of framework for the pool platform steps. Stainless steel items for the house included a chimney cowl, chimney cap, downpipes, trench type floor drains to bathrooms and sliding door tracks to all north facing walls on two levels.

The extensive use of stainless steel in this luxury home highlights the importance of specifying stainless steel for maximum corrosion resistance and enduring visual appeal.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 33, Spring 2005.

Safe Disposal with Simcraft Stainless Steel Products

As a general rule, the waste management method adopted for disposing of radioactive substances is critical. The main method of disposal is the dilution and dispersion of radioactive wastes using stainless steel equipment such as isotope flushing sinks

 

Last year, the University of Western Australia's School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences moved into the new $65M Molecular and Chemical Sciences building with state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment.

Generally, the materials used in biological sciences research work contain low radiotoxicity substances, however, full precautions are taken to ensure safe handling.

As part of the School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences upgrade, many of the laboratories were fitted with a number of isotope sinks and flushing isotope sinks fabricated by ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Simcraft Products.

Isotope flushing sinks are designed to prevent splashing and to allow for the gradual flow of waste liquid into a stream of waters as it runs to waste.

Simcraft Products fabricates the sinks in 1.2mm grade 316 stainless steel with satin finish to the Australian Standard, AS2243.4.

Isotope flushing sinks feature an absolutely splash free flush action with a non-turbulent continuous curtain of water for a total surface wash and can also be custom built for hospitals, medical centres and laboratories.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 35, Autumn 2006.