Drinking to a healthy life with stainless raincatchers


Posted 1 December 2005

As many cities and towns across Australia continue to experience water restrictions due to the drought, seeking solutions to water saving is now a high priority with consumers.

Raincatcher - a unique design that separates the atmospheric and roof pollutants from the water.In 1994, ASSDA member, Hart to Hart Fabrications developed the Raincatcher - a unique design that separates the atmospheric and roof pollutants from the water.

The Raincatcher tank is manufactured from grade 304 stainless steel. Even parts like pins, hinges and filter screens are all made from stainless steel material.

Rainwater from the roof runs through the leaf diverter, removing leaves and large debris. The rainwater then flows through a unique filtration system, diverting atmospheric and roof pollutants away from the main water storage facility.

Raincatcher's main storage facility and filtration system is made from stainless steel due to its high resistance to corrosion, staining and bacteria.

The most frequent concern about drinking water is its bacteriological quality. Research has shown that there is about 100 times less bacteria residue on stainless steel than on other materials.

Raincatcher tanks are a useful solution to the health conscious water consumers, and also to people who live in areas which have particular problems with tap water.  It can be used in combination with existing rural water tanks.

Raincatcher can be used as an additional unit to an existing water tank. The water stored in Raincatcher has passed through the filtration system, making it excellent for drinking and kitchen use.

Raincatcher is an affordable alternative to tap water filtration units, and perhaps in the long term, to bottled spring and mineral water.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005.

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Lounge around in stainless steel daybeds from Klein


Posted 1 December 2005

Lounge around in style on prestige daybeds featuring patterned stainless steel with a relaxed, resort aesthetic.

Klein Architectural's products include outdoor furniture such as the double deckchair, tables, water features, planters, mirrors and more.By night, the beds are a stunning poolside feature with a supplied light box gently projecting a kaleidoscope of colour on the swirling stainless steel surface.

Featuring one hundred percent waterproof UV rated upholstery with welded seams and castor wheels for easy mobility, the 'Ibiza' daybed is ideal for poolside entertaining.

ASSDA member, Klein Architectural has launched the 'Ibiza' daybeds nationally along with a range of other ultra-modern products designed to make life easier.

Working well in both commercial areas as well as in the home, some of Klein Architectural's products include outdoor furniture such as the double deckchair, tables, water features, planters, daybeds, shelving, sinks, vases, letterboxes and mirrors.

Designs include handrails and balustrades, planters, clocks, signage, cladding, stairs and nightclub refurbishments and fittings.

Klein Architectural produces a multitude of materials for both internal and external applications using the signature swirling effect. With over 30 years experience in the metalwork industry, Klein Architectural takes pride in their fine artistic creations fashioned from stainless steel.

The Ibiza daybed by Klein Architectural is ideal for poolside entertaining.Company director, Danny Klein, discovered the technique for creating the distinctive patterning design by chance but keeps the unique tooling method a closely guarded secret.

With a prime focus on providing durable and elegant stainless steel couture, all products are fabricated from stainless steel supplied by ASSDA Major Sponsor, Fagersta Steels.

Klein's artwork will be exclusively distributed by ASSDA member, Rimex Metals (Australia), a company that supplies a complete range of metal finishes for stainless steel.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005.

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Showcasing Adelaide Airport Using Glass and Stainless Steel

Posted 30th November 2005

First impressions count the most when marketing a state to the rest of the world and Adelaide Airport achieved this aim with the construction and opening of a new terminal that combines glass and stainless steel to stunning effect.

Officially opened by Prime Minister John Howard on 7 October 2005, the new terminal is one of South Australia's most significant privately-funded infrastructure projects.

With 14 glass-sided aerobridges, the new terminal will give air travellers all-weather access for the first time in Adelaide Airport's 50 year-history and provide spectacular views across the Adelaide CBD and Mt Lofty Ranges on departure and arrival.

Developers for the Adelaide Airport engaged ASSDA member, Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications to supply stainless steel glass mounted handrails, glazing channels, guardrails and trolley rails.

More than two kilometres of handrail, 1.5 kilometres of guard railing and 150 metres of glazing channel were used in the $260 million project. The stainless steel glazing channel was a key architectural feature that provided Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications with an opportunity to demonstrate their skill and expertise.

The Adelaide-based company developed a unique welded interlocking channel for the 19mm thick glass to rest in using auto-CAD programming. Due to a unique welding process the channel remains straight and distortion free during manufacture and installation.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Sandvik Australia supplied grade 304 and 316 stainless steel pipe and plate to Handrail and Balustrade Fabrications for the project. ASSDA member, Stainless Tube Mills polished and buffed the welded stainless pipe to the architect's specification for a 320 grit finish.

Another ASSDA member, MME Surface Finishing polished the 6mm and 10mm plate. Advanced Cutting Technology cut the 2,000 brackets for the angles slots to create a specially designed wing shape effect.

Adelaide Airport Limited Managing Director, Mr Phil Baker, said “the new terminal will give an extremely positive impression of South Australia - something that we all recognise as important when positioning ourselves on the world stage.”

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34, Summer 2005.

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Pryde Fabrication Celebrates 10 Years in Stainless Steel

Posted 31st October 2005

Warren Pryde has good reason to be proud. His company, Pryde Fabrication, is celebrating a ten year anniversary as a fabricator in the stainless steel industry.

 

Pryde Fabrication began in 1995 in Capalaba, Queensland, when Warren saw an opportunity to install stainless steel commercial kitchens for fabricators followed by a venture into architectural balustrading installation.

“I started with just myself, a ute and a toolbox. There was just one offsider which was my father-in-law.

“Six to eight weeks into it, there wasn’t enough hours in the day. I think I was working probably eighteen hours out of twenty four. Within six months I had five people working for me.”

As the company expanded, other metals were introduced, but predominantly the focus was always stainless steel. After 20 months, it was clear that a factory of his own was needed to support the slowdown that Warren says is probably still coming.

Fast forward to 2005, and Warren has established factories in both Queensland and New South Wales. Warren reflects on what would be the company’s most significant stainless steel project achievements to date.

“Definitely the RiverWalk project balustrading ... it’s a job that we’re certainly proud of internally. That’s up there as ‘challenging’ and the finish we ended up supplying out there we were more than happy with.”

The company’s sustained focus on quality has seen Pryde Fabrication develop a strong leadership role in the stainless steel industry.

When the Australian Stainless Steel Development Association launched the ASSDA Accreditation Scheme in early 2004, Pryde Fabrication was one of Australia’s first companies to be industry-recognised as an ASSDA Accredited Fabricator.

“Unfortunately there are some people playing around on the stainless side that shouldn’t be there. The market is so price driven these days, the margins are tight.

“I thought [the Scheme] was good mainly from the point of view that there was an assurance there that the client was going to get what they actually expect from the stainless steel.

“When you come up against another Accredited Fabricator you don’t mind because they are pricing the right material, the right structure. We saw this [Scheme] as a way to market ourselves as a top quality fabricator in the stainless steel industry.

Warren says that he still hasn’t got a sales representative on the road, instead attributing the company’s success to return business and offers his plans for the next ten years.

“A realistic figure is trying to double our turnover ... we’re ready for another expansion right across our market, whether it be the street furniture, commercial kitchens or the architectural side.

“We’re looking at increasing that [marketshare] without needing too many sales reps on the ground. So we’re still looking at that return business basis”.

The gains from having an ASSDA Accredited Fabricator status has resulted in benefits for his clients, his company and the whole industry.

Warren describes how the Scheme has assisted his company in marketing his business to the specifying community.

“With a lot of the government departments getting our name put in front of the right people with the order books ... they know what can happen to stainless if it’s not done the right way”.

Finally, Warren has this advice for fabricators starting out in the stainless steel industry.

“Companies who haven’t got the experience, if they get in touch with ASSDA they have the opportunity to do it the right way.

“At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter who does the stainless work out there, if it’s done properly, it’s only going to be better for the industry and better for our company - because the majority of our work is stainless.”

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 33, Spring 2005.

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Creating consumer appeal with Koolall and stainless steel


Posted 1 September 2005

Food retail shops and bars are constantly vying for the attention of consumers. Presentation is everything and stainless steel appeal can often be an essential ingredient to business success.

LENARD'S POULTRY SHOP

Lenard's Poultry Shop - voted Best Food Retailer 2005One such Australian business success is Lenard's Poultry. Lenard's was voted the Best Food Retailer in Australia by the National Retail Association at the 2005 Rewards for Excellence.

With more than 194 stores throughout Australia and more planned to open in the next financial year, Lenard's went head-to-head with some heavy-weight competitors including supermarkets, takeaway food and fresh food retailers to secure the prestigious title.

According to ASSDA Accredited Fabricator, Koolall Manufacturing, creating consumer appeal requires working closely with business franchisees and shopowners to ensure a quality presentation and functional design.

Established in 1979, current owner Igor Theodoridis purchased the company in 1986. Situated between Brisbane and the Gold Coast, Koolall Manufacturing specialises in the design and manufacture of custom stainless steel commercial kitchens and refrigeration cabinets.

Mr Theodoridis says often franchisee owners must “run to a deadline that's set by shopping centres” to ensure that all shops open simultaneously and on schedule.

With more than 17 years experience working with franchisees for Lenard's and the Coffee Club, Koolall's personal approach to handling fitouts for commercial kitchens and hotels is an enviable achievement.

THE COFFEE CLUB

Koolall designs, manufactures and installs fridges, cake displays and kitchen preparation benching and equipment for more than 105 Coffee Club outlets in Australia and New Zealand.Koolall Manufacturing offers uncomplicated, full service fitouts that effectively streamlines the shopfitting process leaving clients like The Coffee Club free to focus on the business - not the fitout.

Since the opening of the first Coffee Club franchise in 1989, Koolall Manufacturing's team work hard to ensure that the Coffee Club brand and culture is consistently achieved.

The company designs, manufactures and installs fridges, cake displays and kitchen preparation benching and equipment for more than 105 Coffee Club outlets in Australia and New Zealand.

GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL

A major refit of one of Brisbane's great railway bars, Fihelly's Arms Hotel, has seen the city venue transform into the Grand Central Hotel.

Koolall Manufacturing designed, manufactured and installed the stainless steel refrigeration units and benching for the main public bar, commercial kitchen and Platform - a bar for trainspotters and travellers looking for a tipple.

And with a hotel that offers about 20 beers on tap, Koolall's design assistance was critical in positioning beer fonts, glass racks and benches for staff to operate as efficiently as possible.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 34 - Summer 2005

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Making Over the MCG with Stainless Steel Technology


Posted 31st August 2005



The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) or the ‘G’ as it has become affectionately known, has an important project deadline.

The national sports icon is currently undergoing a redevelopment in preparation for the 2006 Commonwealth Games to be held in March.

When complete, the ‘G’ will boast three impressive glazed entry structures over the Ponsford Gate, the Members Entrance and the Olympic Stand Entrance, each with its own network of high tensile stainless steel members.

The project is a collaboration between Ronstan’s architectural division and steel contractor, Materials Fabrication.

ASSDA member, and Australia’s own world leader in tension structures, Ronstan Architectural Rigging Systems, has been intimately involved in the supply of stainless steel tension rods on the project.

Ronstan looked at the loads required and selected the material grade for the specific tensile characteristics. This allows for the optimal efficiency of the tendon in transferring the load, a key requirement in lightweight tensile architecture.

In this case the ‘G’ structures included 600 tendons with adjustable fork ends manufactured from approximately two kilometres of 19mm grade 316L stainless steel bar.

These were polished to a No. 7 finish and passivated to achieve the required aesthetics and longevity.

“The challenge was to compliment a great product with the right mix of product support,” said Rowan Murray, General Manager of Ronstan Architectural Rigging Systems.

Images courtesy of John Gollings.
This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 32, Winter 2005.

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Turning industrial systems into architectural features


Posted 1 July 2005

A Queensland stainless steel fabrication company has successfully turned a product usually found in industrial environments into an architectural design feature that is gaining popularity on Australia’s east coast.

AMP Building entry matsStainless steel screens and grates have traditionally been used for filtering and cleaning in the mining, petrochemical, food processing and water treatment industries — applications where water transfer is required.

ASSDA member, Paige Stainless Fabrications has taken the grating concept further, beyond a simple drainage system, by using the product in architectural applications such as stair treads,  walkways and entry mats.

Paige Stainless Fabrications designs and manufactures ‘heel proof’ stainless steel products using close bar longitudinal / transverse grating.

One example of the product in action can be found at the Andrew ‘Boy’ Charlton Pool, Sydney, a popular swimming icon suspended over spectacular Woolloomooloo Bay.

Architects, Lippmann Associates, won a RAIA Architecture award in 2003 for public building design. As part of the project design, Lippmann Associates specified stainless steel stair treads and entry mats.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied grade 316 L stainless steel to the project because of it’s high corrosion resistance. The stainless steel product delivered the desired functional, environmental and aesthetic values that find appeal to architectural environments rather than traditional forms of drainage.

In further applications, the grade 304 stainless steel grating product has been used extensively for entry mats to the following buildings:

  • Ambros Building (corner Bent and Phillip Streets, Sydney).
  • AMP Building - Sydney
  • Customs House, Sydney
  • IBM Building, Sydney
  • National Australia Bank Administration, Melbourne Docklands

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 32, Winter 2005.

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Strata: A Majestic Streetscape in Stainless Steel


Posted 31 January 2005

When South Australian developer, John Culshaw of Pentroth Pty Ltd proposed the design for the Majestic Roof Garden Hotel in Adelaide, the original proposal was for plain vertical bars for the car park grille of the Bent Street facade

Instead of surrendering to drab, pre-fab vertical bar grille designs, the developer actively sought a stylish alternative to the car park status quo. He commissioned artists Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell to create ‘Strata’, a stainless steel grille design that aesthetically showcases the hotel building and provides a ‘majestic streetscape’ experience for Bent Street pedestrians.

The artists’ intention was to excise the barrier that would be created by the vertical security bars, which were uninviting at street level. Taking this as their starting point, they researched the replacement of verticals with horizontals to create a calm but dynamic form.

Strata lines of sandstone (used on the Frome Street facade of the hotel), contour lines, isobars from weather charts and the winged roof line of the hotel all helped to drive the inspiration for the unique design. From these lines, the artists devised a series of twenty-two panels, in sets of one, two and three. Each set is a unique design so that the complexity of the concept was acknowledged.

The grille runs the length of the hotel on Bent Street, integrates with the building and the electrically operated entrance doors to the car park and storage areas of the hotel. The nature of these horizontal waving lines creates a dynamic effect because it seems that they swing in and out because of an optical illusion when viewed from an oblique angle. By day the sky and daylight are reflected from the satin surface of the steel and at night the street and hotel lighting is reflected.

The artists chose stainless steel for their artwork for several reasons. The material used had to be strong to fulfill the structural requirements of a security grille. The artists also required it to be aesthetically complementary to the contemporary and stylish design of the hotel.

The artists went through an intense design development stage to arrive at a formula for the curving lines that worked visually. Using this formula each panel was then drawn on a computer as vector lines, which were then converted to DXF files for driving the laser cutting equipment.

The panels were fabricated by Donato Steel Fabrications from 4mm thick 304 grade stainless steel sheet supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Sandvik Australia Pty Ltd. The artists’ designs were laser cut by Molnar Laser Cutting Services and then plate linished both sides to a number four satin finish. The sheets were then welded on the inside into the frames constructed of 38mm square stainless steel tube supplied by ASSDA major sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals.

The intention with these panels was to create a frame within a frame, the second frame being the walls and pillars of the hotel into which they were bolted. Therefore, the construction of the panels became part of the artwork.

The artists are very pleased with the result of the installation of ‘Strata’. Pentroth Pty Ltd and the Adelaide City Council are pleased that it adds to the ambience of Bent Street and creates a lively streetscape for pedestrians. Opposite the Hotel (and currently under construction) are Bent Street Apartments which will have retail facilities at ground floor level – ‘Strata’ provides a pleasant environment on the street which is also overlooked by the apartments above.

The stainless steel fabrication meets all the requirements of a car park security grille while providing a lively streetscape in the city. The artists believe this is a good example of creating something meaningful out of a necessity. That is, a car park grille that had to be created but it did not need to be ugly and aggressive for pedestrians at street level or for those living in the adjacent apartments.

Images courtesy of Sue Rodwell and Trevor Rodwell.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

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Stainless Steel Enhances Hayman Island Views


Posted 30 January 2005

North Queensland's Hayman Island Resort welcomes thousands of guests every year to the Great Barrier Reef island destination. Also attracted by the beauty of the resort, cockatoos have eaten away at the timber balcony railings and balustrades

To combat the work of the troublesome cockatoos, the resort management called for stainless steel to replace the timber railings and balustrades on the fifteen year old building.

ASSDA major sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied approximately 1,000 linear metres of grade 316 stainless steel including 76 x 42mm oval tube and 38mm diameter round tube in high polish to Mackay-based fabricator, Jeff Eales Sheetmetal for the project.

Stainless steel was used extensively for the balcony top rail and posts on all three levels of the pool wing accommodation block. Because many of the balconies are at the edge of the pool, oval profile tube was specified to prevent glasses or bottles being placed on the rail and then being bumped into the pool.

Also, to ensure guests receive uninterrupted ocean views, stainless steel wire rope was installed on each of the balustrades. This helped to eliminate the restricted views given by the previous timber material.

ASSDA member, Arcus Australia Pty Ltd supplied stainless steel wire for the balcony balustrades and ASSDA member Bridco supplied the wire fittings, turnbuckles and swages for the resort balustrading redevelopment.

Guests have commented on how the use of stainless steel complements the surroundings, improves the views and suits the building style.

Hayman Island Resort management are also impressed with the new stainless steel railing as it stops the bird problem, requires low maintenance and is easy to clean. All these qualities make the tropical ocean views much better.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 30, January 2005.

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Reflecting Urban Renewal with Stainless Steel Cladding

Posted 30th September 2004

Shining the way in major urban renewal precinct development is the Fujitsu Building, a speculative office building utilising stainless steel cladding to form a striking ‘gateway’ into Brisbane city.

Situated on Breakfast Creek Road, the five-storey Fujitsu Building is the first of three buildings in the ‘Portal Business Community’ to be developed by Ariadne Australia under a master plan by architects and planners, Cox Rayner.

‘Portal’ reflects an urban renewal of the former industrial site that has been used for petroleum storage and as a gasworks since the 1880’s including the preservation of Queensland’s oldest metal frame gasometer.

With this industrial setting in mind, the Fujitsu Building comprises economical materials and solar treatments to create intriguing textures in unconventional ways.

Whereas many speculative office buildings typically appear anonymous and soulless, the Fujitsu Building is an endeavour to demonstrate how speculative office buildings can be designed within meagre budgets to impart character reflective of place. This character was achieved by adopting an efficient floor plan and combining inexpensive materials such as stainless steel cladding.

The master plan concept turns the building through 90 degrees to north/south. This initiative optimises passive energy efficiency through screened and recessed glazing, ground level set-in, thermally insulated lightweight panel cladding and the concept of the roof as shade parasol.

Stramit Building Products selected uncoated stainless steel from their premium products range to create contrasted profilles and textures. ASSDA major sponsor, Austral Wright Metals provided technical assistance by recommending and supplying grade 445M2 stainless steel from ASSDA sponsor Nisshin Steel Company in Japan.

Grade 445M2 is a ferritic stainless steel that offers superior corrosion resistance compared to grade 316. A lower reflectivity matt finish was chosen for the site, next to one of the main roads into the Brisbane central business district. The matt finish doesn’t compromise the corrosion resistance of the grade, which is important as the Brisbane River is very close.

445M2 is suitable for roofing and cladding in marine environments and other areas where the environment is too severe for grade 304. Because it is ferritic, grade 445M2 has mechanical and physical properties more like carbon steel than the austenitic grades and is much easier to roll form into flat panels like those on the Fujitsu Building.

Thermal expansion is similar to carbon steel, so the grade can be designed with long roofing and cladding spans using well known practices.

The Fujitsu Building has received industry awards including the 2002 Queensland Metal Building Product Design award and the 2003 QMBA award for commercial projects over $10 million.

The final two buildings of the Portal Business Community will comprise a 42 apartment development with views of the Brisbane River and a four level office building modelled on the Fujitsu Building.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 29, September 2004.

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National Gallery of Victoria

Showcasing Art with Stainless

Posted 31st May 2004

The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) houses one of Australia’s most important visual arts collections. However, with the passage of time, the collection had outgrown its facilities.

Since the existing building opened in 1968, the collection had doubled in size and only five percent of the Gallery’s collection was on display at any one time.

As part of a major upgrade and renovations to the existing Gallery, the Victorian State Government called on construction company Baulderstone Hornibrook to lead the project.

Architect Mario Bellini, from Milan, with Australian firm, Metier 3, used stainless steel to stunning effect in a design framework that seamlessly integrates the contemporary ‘metallic’ look of stainless whilst keeping much of the original heritage feature intact.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Sandvik supplied 10 tonnes of 304 stainless steel including solid bar, hot rolled flat and heavy angles for the project. Most of the stainless steel was surface linished by Silverstone and some was electropolished by ASSDA member MME Surface Finishing.

Applied Manufacturing fabricated glazed ramps and walkways, solid staunchens, glass panel frames and door surrounds for the courtyard in addition to balustrading, external handrails, rigging systems and feature mesh screens.

Fractal Systems supplied an imported stainless steel mesh product for the ceilings in the foyer and feature walls in the Federation Court.

This type of mesh consists of stainless steel rods in one direction and has stainless steel ropes threaded/woven in the other. Mesh was used for three reasons. Firstly it is semi-transparent, secondly it reflects light and finally it has an appealing visual texture, all dramatically influencing the ultimate sense of place.

In the feature walls, the mesh was mounted in panels framed with stainless steel angle frames bolted to the substructure. In the ceilings, the mesh was stretched over a curved sub-structure and tensioned at both ends. Other than these two main elements, stainless steel was used as floor cladding in locations where visual transition was required between two types of flooring (eg. parquetry and glass floors), as cladding to ceiling bulkheads and for struts in the glass roof trusses and cast hold-down ‘spiders’.

Zorana Zankasar from Metier 3 Architects, Victoria said that “stainless steel is almost a necessary component of the contemporary design. It is hard to imagine a major contemporary building without stainless steel”.

“I believe that because stainless steel offers trouble-free maintenance combined with the look of metallic”, said Zankasar.

The project started in January 2001 and the gallery was re-opened to the public in December 2003.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 28, May 2004.

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Stainless Makes Waves at Mentone Girls Grammar

Posted 31st May 2004

Mentone Girls Grammar School, beside Melbourne’s Port Philip Bay, set out to make a statement in stainless by turning what was an unused area of the school into an asset that is now making waves with drivers along the popular Beach Road.

Inspired by the coastal environment of Port Philip Bay, architects from Environmental Resources Management Australia (ERM) prepared a masterplan that comprised a feature rendered block wall with curved stainless steel infill panels and entry gates between piers.

The landscape design for Mentone Girls Grammar School called for a new entry to Beach Road, a popular local road running along the edge of Port Phillip Bay.

It involved the fabrication of a series of curves using 12mm diameter grade 316 stainless steel bars to simulate waves.

ERM architect, Chris Bell said that the sculptural nature of stainless steel and its ability to withstand the harsh coastal climate played an important role in its selection.

“We wanted to use a material that was robust enough to withstand the harsh coastal environment, that could be used to create a sculptural look and was low maintenance.

“We tried to keep things simple to reduce costs. By using standard metal sizes we were able to create something that was cost effective and visually striking,” said Bell.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Sandvik, supplied 316 L stainless steel to Newco. A nylon die was used to form the bars which were fabricated with fully adjustable hinges.

To give the job a high quality and highly corrosion resistant finish, Newco specified electropolishing on the infill panels and gates. This was performed by ASSDA member, MME Surface Finishing.

ERM wanted a flexible material with a strong architectural and sculptural feel to the design. Stainless steel was ideal for this purpose with positive feedback from motorists driving along Beach Road.

Photos by Jeff James, Newco.
This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 28, May 2004.

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Stainless technology to remember war heroes


Posted 1 May 2004

The Australian War Memorial in Hyde Park Corner, London stands as a symbol of freedom and an enduring spirit of strength.

To commemorate the men and women who fought and died for Australia alongside Britons in the two World Wars, Australian architectural firm Tonkin Zulaikha Greer and artist Janet Laurence designed the Memorial to reflect the sweep of the Australian landscape.

The result was a highly durable structure featuring a long, curved wave wall constructed out of West Australian green granite and supported by grade 316L stainless steel.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, and ASSDA members, M & S Stainless Supplies and Dalsteel Stainless supplied approximately 9000 kilos of stainless steel for the structure including 8mm plate, pipe, angles and 3mm sheet.

Grade 316L was specified for its corrosion resistance, particularly as the Memorial comprises a water feature that periodically cascades water across the wall to highlight the names of the hometowns of our soldiers.

Stainless steel was used primarily in the construction of stainless steel cradles which were fabricated in Australia, shipped, positioned and lifted into place to support the granite.

All welds were pickled and passivated to provide protection from the bromine and chlorine’s likely to be deposited on the frames from the water forms built into the Memorial.

Australian-based firm Design and Survey Neon (DSN) played a leading role in the design and manufacture of the supporting structure by using 3D modelling techniques.

The 3D modelling allowed the manufacture of components and assembly of the job to become a seamless process.

DSN modelled the granite wave wall and supporting cradles. The templates for the granite blocks and their fixings were then lifted from the model to enable the fixings to be pre-drilled prior to assembly.

The use of laser cutting and CNC technologies allowed DSN to fabricate to near machining tolerances. Laser etching of assembly notches were added for simple fabrication and installation.

Coordinates for supporting cradles from the model were used to determine correct on-site positioning via electronic theodolites.

The granite blocks were positioned with a 6mm gap vertically and horizontally to a tolerance of plus or minus 1mm. Precise accuracy was required to avoid accumulation of errors because of its wave like design.

Most of the components for the Memorial were imported from Australia. Water features and water effects were created by Waterforms International and all the stone work was assembled by Australians.

This article was featured in Australian Stainless Issue 28, May 2004.

Photos courtesy of Department of Veteran Affairs & Design and Survey Neon (DSN).

Main image: The Australian War Memorial 'Dedication Day Wreaths' placed in front of the curved granite wave wall. Photo courtesy of the Department of Veterans Affairs, copyright Commonwealth of Australia. Reproduced by permission.

Other images: 316 stainless steel cradles were lifted into place to support the granite blocks that form the wave wall.

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Brisbane RiverWalk: Floating in Stainless

Posted 28th February 2004



Brisbane residents can now walk on water with the completion of the Brisbane City Council's RiverWalk floating walkway.

Stainless steel is at the heart of the 850 metre-long, 5.4 metre-wide pontoon system that effectively connects the city and the inner suburb of New Farm.

The pontoon structure, positioned 35 metres from the riverbank, has been designed to allow people to experience the feeling of being on the river - of literally walking on water.

Brisbane Lord Mayor Tim Quinn said "Brisbane is now truly Australia's River City as we're making greater use of our river system than any other state in the country.

"Completion of this vital section of RiverWalk will also have the added benefit of enhancing the city's public transport network by offering immediate access to interchanges including City Cat, ferry services, bus and rail."

Made up of a state-of-the-art pontoon system that wraps around the shoreline, it boasts world first technology that was designed and engineered in Queensland.

ASSDA supported the project by responding to more than 40 enquiries for technical assistance for the Brisbane City Council project.

Fabricating the Top-Side Structure

ASSDA member, Pryde Fabrication, supplied 35 tonnes of handrails and posts to the $13.5 million project and was instrumental in fabricating many of the environmental design elements featured on the walkway.

Pryde produced 60 individually curved handrails to create a visual effect of the ebb and flow of the Brisbane River, whilst support posts and the straining posts that holds all the load incorporates a distinct 'mangrove' design.

Grade 316 stainless steel was used throughout the fabrication of handrails, balustrades and staunches with a smooth surface finish enhanced by electropolishing.

RiverWalk Stainless Steel - ASSDA Members Suppliers

Pryde Fabrication Top-side structure - handrails, balustrades and staunches
Arminox Australia Reinforcing bars in pontoons
Ronstan International Cables and rigging materials
Sandvik Stainless steel supply to Pryde Fabrication
Atlas Speciality Metals Stainless steel supply to Pryde Fabrication
Condamine Wellscreens Electropolishing services to Pryde Fabrication
Johnson Screens Stainless steel supply to Pryde Fabrication
Tom Stoddart Pty Ltd Supply of stainless steel pole guides

Reinforcing the Pontoons

The key to RiverWalk's extended lifecycle was the use of stainless steel reinforcement by ASSDA member, Arminox Australia in the design of the 287 floating pontoons.

Most concrete reinforcing uses carbon steel, however, in marine structures where the material is exposed to chlorides in the salt water, it can corrode and cause the concrete to crack and deteriorate over time.

Arminox supplied 140 tonnes of reinforcing bar material, cut and bent to the customer's schedule in 10, 12 and 16 mm diameters.

Using specialised machinery, Arminox was able to save Brisbane City Council thousands of dollars by cutting out and tying a number of lap joints with a 40mm diameter overlap.

By reducing the thickness of concrete cover the Council saved two cubic metres of concrete per pontoon.

This initiative resulted in a lighter pontoon that contributed to increased buoyancy and lower costs for the Council.

With a total of 450 kg per pontoon, tighter tolerance control meant enhanced low material wastage.

Stainless reinforcing builds corrosion resistance into the concrete and durability has been proven over many decades.

World Class Achievement

ASSDA congratulates all members who supplied stainless steel to the Brisbane City Council's RiverWalk floating walkway, naming the project "a Queensland world class achievement designed to last 100 years with minimal maintenance".

ASSDA Executive Director, Richard Matheson inspected the 850 metre floating pontoon system after its official launch in December 2003 and congratulated the Brisbane City Council on a durable feature that would only have been made possible with stainless steel.

"The RiverWalk is a world class achievement designed to last 100 years and to achieve this aim 181 tonnes of stainless steel was specified for its durability in not only handrails, posts and cabling but also for reinforcing in the pontoons," Richard Matheson said.

"Stainless steel is at the heart of the RiverWalk project because of the material's non-corrosive properties and excellent presentation despite harsh environments," said Mr Matheson.

The RiverWalk will now provide direct riverfront access for around 20,000 walkers, cyclists, joggers and rollerbladers everyday.

RiverWalk Stainless Steel Specification Checklist

  • 850 metre floating walkway
  • 287 floating pontoons
  • 181 tonnes of stainless steel
  • 20 km of stainless steel wire
  • 2,534 kg of stainless steel wire cable
  • 135 kg of stainless steel rigging fittings
  • 1,800 linear metres of handrail
  • 1,750 support posts/staunches
  • 60 individually curved panels
  • 140 tonnes of reinforcement bars
  • 35 tonnes of handrail and posts

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 27, February 2004.

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Making a big entrance with stainless steel


Posted 1 February 2004

Fusing industrial technology with the domestic aesthetic is a hard challenge, but Architect, Zelman McLaren of Z1 Designs has mastered it by transferring stainless steel industrial wire rope into an attractive household feature for front doors.

The stainless steel braided door pull creates a unique alternative, adding flair to house entrance designs.McLaren has combined both his profession of architecture with the industrial world of wire rope manufacture to invent a stunning range of braided door pulls that blur the lines between wall mounted art and the functional door pull.

The invention came about from a 'technology transfer' thanks to an 'Orbital Braider' invention developed by McLaren's father, Raymond McLaren of Andromeda Engineering.

The 'Orbital Braider' braids stainless steel wire into a rope which then acts as a stocking to lift and pull large electricity powerlines into place.

ASSDA member, Midway Metals in Newcastle supplied the 304 stainless steel for the bollards for the manufacture of the door pulls.

William Cotterill, Director of Australian Door Furniture said the design distinctly stands out as a product that will compliment any home or commercial premises.

"Its clean yet bold lines lend subtle curves that work on straight linear doors to the more rounded tropical style, lending a nautical feel to coastal properties," Mr Cotterill said.

The door pull series ranges from Z1 to Z8 and are supplied in both a polished and satin finish complete with stainless steel bollards.

Designs can be personalised with the addition of corporate logos / business names to the tops of the stainless steel bollard connectors.

The design will soon be available as a range of turn handles and will appeal to style conscious homeowners and our most renowned architects.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 27, February 2004.

 

Photos by Zelman McLaren, Z1 Designs

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Stainless Deco Tube for Safety and Style


Posted 30 November 2003

The humble stainless steel rail is set to become a visual feature with the introduction of an innovative new product that people just can't keep their hands off.

Decorative Tube or Deco Tube has already started making waves on Queensland's Sunshine Coast with a choice between six different patterns suitable for a whole range of applications.

Caboolture Wheelchairs' new Custom Stallion GT design made with stainless Deco Tube.An Expression of Individuality

Caboolture Wheelchairs manufactures a range of customised manual and electric wheelchairs made of stainless steel for disabled people, sporting wheelies, hospitals and nursing homes.

The company sought to transform an ordinary functional wheelchair frame into a stylish feature by using a Deco N8 tube pattern to create a unique, individualised look (pictured below - left).

Unlike most stainless steel applications, wheelchairs are not polished but powdercoated in a range of colours to overcome the stigmatic 'institutional' image.

Caboolture Wheelchairs applies clear blue or red colour powdercoat on the 1.2mm thickness tube supplied by ASSDA member, Tubesales (Qld) to retain the distinct pattern effect.

Ronca Sheetmetal's office foyer display feature fabricated using Rimex sign lettering and stainless Deco Tube.A Distinctive Foyer Display Feature

Caloundra-based ASSDA member, Ronca Sheetmetal wanted to show their interior design clients a myriad of options available to them using stainless steel materials.

Since the office foyer was due for minor refurbishment, the company opted to create a curved display feature wall that doubled as an internal company sign (pictured below - centre).

A Deco N8 tube was used for the feature rail to highlight the new product ... and to impress.

Manufactured in 304 stainless by ASSDA member, National Tube Mills, the feature rail measures 38.1mm in diameter with a thickness of 1.5mm.

This feature rail was complemented with sign lettering using a passivated 6WL stainless supplied by ASSDA member, Rimex Metals.

A feature rail made with stainless Deco Tube in the wine cellar of Sails Restaurant, NoosaA Wine Cellar with Function and Style

Lyndon Simmons, the owner of Sails Restaurant in Noosa loves stainless steel. Simmons has specified so much stainless steel at the popular restaurant location on Hastings Street that staff nickname him the 'Steel Man'.

So it was no surprise that Simmons jumped at the chance to use Deco Tube for a railing in the restaurant's wine cellar when told of the product by Sunrise Hills Welding and Mechanical.

The Noosaville company installed 304 stainless Deco N8 with a 31.8mm diameter and a thickness of 1.2mm.

The contrast of the timber wine racks combined with the stainless steel railings with minimal lighting creates a warm, alluring visual effect that highlights the quality wine collection.

The Deco N8 tube pattern available in six different patterns increasing to nine in the near future.Properties of Deco Tube

Deco Tube is suitable for bending, polishing and powder coating. Ductility does not change and due to the distinctive patern, tensile strength is increased dramatically. In fact, Deco Tube has approximately 70% higher tensile strength than standard tube, due to the cold working, which is required to produce the patterned surface.

Higher strength can result in weight savings by allowing designs in lighter wall thickness, which can be particularly important in the transportation industry.

Deco Tube is also suitable for use as accessories in bathrooms, marine environments or anywhere where safety is an issue.

The product is expected to be popular with Councils, architects, bending companies, boat manufacturers, home decorators and shopfitters.

Marketed by Tubesales (Qld), Deco Tube is designed and manufactured by National Tube Mills, Brisbane with material supplied by ASSDA member, AvestaPolarit (now trading as Outokumpu).

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 26, November 2003.

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Specifying Stainless for a Salt Air Setting


Posted 1 July 2003

Architect Jan Jensen was a consultant to Brisbane City Council on the design of the Brisbane Riverwalk, currently under construction. The walk will take pedestrians from the CBD to the inner suburb of New Farm along the river.

At this proximity to Moreton Bay, the water is brackish and the air salt-laden - it is destructive to most construction materials. Corrosion-resistant stainless steel was chosen for this landmark project to deliver the 100 year service life required by the asset owner.

The structure consists of floating pontoons, reinforced with 316 stainless steel deformed bar. There are stainless steel balustrades and light poles and a suite of stainless street furniture.

Jensen describes the process of specifying the correct finish, including gaining a theoretical understanding and producing prototypes:

The Starting Point
As a key parameter of design responsibility 'value for money' the decision to use stainless steel was an easy one. Our rationale was: "It doesn't corrode and our work is in salt-affected air; it lasts forever; it is low maintenance; it will save us money and keep on looking good."

We needed a specification to let contracts for the manufacture of street and riverscape elements. Writing a specification required describing and reproducing the manufacturing process exactly to get reliable, predictable, consistent and economic results.

Our research took us to ASSDA's timely seminar on the fifty most frequently asked questions about stainless steel, where we were able to ask about tea-staining and how to avoid it.

Then we talked to manufacturers. The answers to our questions about surface roughness and the finishes available made us realise there were variations within the industry and we needed to define our requirements with scientific precision. Specifically, we needed to know the surface roughness (Ra) in microns (µm), as the labels 2B, No. 4 and so on refer to the method used to achieve the finish and comprise an Ra range.

Building Prototypes
We concluded that to write our specification we needed to build the product first to set it within the theory and the 'standard range of common industry manufacturing practice'. We commissioned prototypes of a balustrade and a light pole then the furniture suite for the Riverwalk: seats, bollards, bins, lights, sign posts and drinking fountain.

Forge Brothers Engineering produced the prototypes. It drew on the expertise of ASSDA and its members University of Queensland Materials Performance, 3M Australia, Heat & Control, Condamine Wellscreens, Ronstan International as well as AbrasiveFlex and Dana Ridge.

We soon realised that:

> The common system of finish grades is not a measure of surface roughness, eg the Ra of No. 4 finish products measures anywhere from 0.45 to 0.8µm depending on product form and supplier. Typical Ra for sheet is 0.3 to 0.4µm while it is not unusual for other products such as flat bar to be rougher. Thick plate, thin plate (sheet), tube, flat bar and hollow bar are manufactured by different processes which produce different finishes. The surface finish changes in hot rolled plate and gets smoother as the plate reduces in thickness.

> Ra meters were not commonly used in the industry although their use is growing.

> All abrasives aren't the same. Wear and tear and pressure make a difference. We tested non-woven abrasive belts, Trizact belts, air wheels and silicon carbide.

> The electro-polishing industry uses a variety of chemical baths and voltages.

Towards a Specification
In arriving at our specification we learned:

> Best practice calls for a finish below 0.5µm combined with electro-polishing to eliminate sulphides and increase the chromium content of the exposed surface.

> Wet blasting at low air pressure levels with a water and abrasive bead mix provides a consistent surface finish and economically removes surface variations ready for electro-polishing. This avoids the unexpected rise in roughness which can occur when electro-polishing removes microscopic peaks, previously flattened by mechanical polishing, to uncover underlying pits.

The proof that our specification works can be seen on the Brisbane River. After twelve months in a salt air environment our prototypes are still looking clean and new.

Words by Jan Jensen.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 25, July 2003.

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Mirror Mirror on the Water

Stainless Steel Fish Bar


Posted 31st March 2003

Development of Melbourne's Docklands Precinct has inspired an exciting range of creative architecture, featuring a diverse selection of building materials.

Special finish stainless steel enhances the facades of the prestigious NewQuay follies on Victoria Harbour promenade. The Fish Bar folly, clad entirely in blue mirror stainless steel, brings life to the water's edge by combining public convenience with creativity to produce a unique example of urban art.

The design is the result of a successful collaboration between the developer MAB Corporation, SJB/FKA architects and students from the upper design pool of RMIT's School of Architecture, which ran a design competition.

The winning concept, by students Sherry-Ann Kwok and Jessica Liew, was deemed to successfully unify and integrate art and architecture into a commercial or retail environment. The underlying aim of the follies was to create sophisticated architectural forms that break up the hard edge against the water and create defined destinations as people move around NewQuay.

Blue mirror stainless steel from ASSDA member Rimex Metals was chosen as it evokes suggestions of frozen water and adds bold, bright colour to the building, which consists of an arrangement of raking, interlocking planes. The physical properties of stainless steel and its corrosion resistance in this salt-water environment make the material a logical selection.

The Colouring Process

As coloured mirror stainless steel is generally only produced in grade 304, a special mill run of 316 material was produced by Rimex UK to fulfill the architects' requirements for corrosion resistance and colour continuity.

Grade 316 stainless steel sheets were polished to a mirror finish before being coloured. In the colouring process, the stainless is immersed in a chemical bath to closely control the generation of the chromium-rich oxide film. This clear oxide film is present in all stainless steel and is the key to its excellent corrosion resistance.

By varying the film's thickness, a range of colours is produced, the same way that oil floating on the water's surface produces a rainbow effect. No dyes or pigments are used: the colour is due entirely to the physics of light distorting as it bounces off the stainless steel surface and back through the oxide layer.

Construction

Commercial builders, Icon Construction Management, were commissioned to construct the building. There were some challenging hurdles as the building is perched half on the pier and half over water supported by pylons.

Construction was performed from a barge with the use of booms and scissor lifts from the wharf.

Fabrication of the Rimex blue mirror sheet into cladding panels and their installation was performed by Alustain Fabrications, a Melbourne firm specialising in architectural stainless steel cladding.

The interlocking panels were pressed into individual pans and attached to a waterproof plywood substrate before fixing to a top hat section. The complex design called for almost every panel to be unique.

Together they form a weatherproof barrier capable of withstanding demanding coastal conditions. Unlike most faades, the stainless steel cladding was installed at the beginning of construction, enabling fixings to be concealed with only a 1-2mm margin between panels. ASSDA member, Fagersta Steels Pty Ltd, supplied the stainless steel for the project.

The Fish Bar folly contributes to the mix of open space experiences aimed at meeting the diverse needs of residents and visitors. The contemporary design and material selection demonstrate stainless steel's potential for integrating architecture and urban art.

Words: Neil Lyons, Photos: Anna Joske
This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 24, March 2003.

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Sheer Delight

Stainless Steel Mesh


Posted 1 December 2002

Woven metal fabrics are a popular architectural product in Europe, where stainless steel mesh is used for a high-level finish in many internal and external settings, such as wall and ceiling panelling, space dividers, external cladding and facades.

Now Sydney firm Interspace Manufacturing Pty Ltd is making and installing woven stainless steel wire mesh screens using metal fabrics from iO Metal Fabrics Pty Ltd, a German firm with an Australian presence and a member of ASSDA.

ASSDA member Interspace has been designing and manufacturing store fittings and custom fixtures for displays and exhibitions since 1970. The firm began utilising stainless steel mesh two years ago and has produced partitions for a number of interiors, including the AMP Building in Sydney and the office of medical supply firm B. Braun, designed by Leffler Simes Architects. Another project is Space 207 in St Leonards, Sydney, which is being billed as "the North Shore's finest office building, so advanced it is destined to lead the way in business premises for a long time to come." The designers of Space 207 set out to create an environment representing "style, sophistication and elegance" and chose stainless steel mesh to complement the building's hi-tech, ultra-modern decor.

Woven stainless steel fabrics are versatile and reliable. Made from corrosion-resistant grade 316 stainless, they are equally at home in hostile external locations requiring stainless steel's hard-wearing capability and in internal spaces where aesthetic values come to the fore. They can be put to a variety of uses, including partitions, wall and ceiling cladding, awnings and sunscreens. In Germany they are also employed in roadside noise reduction barriers.

Stainless mesh is lightweight but strong and it is extremely resilient when subjected to environmental threats such as heavy weather, fire and chemicals.

Like textiles generally, metal fabrics are woven on a loom, producing an attractive array of patterns and textures in a varying degrees of weight and flexibility.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 23, December 2002.

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Walsh Bay

A Style Statement in Stainless


Posted 1 December 2002

The transformation of Sydney's Walsh Bay from derelict wharves and sheds into a prestigious residential complex, complete with cultural, retail and commercial facilities, provides a stage for Australian innovation in design and technology, including some of the finest examples of stainless steel structural and architectural applications.

Located amid Sydney's landmarks -the Opera House, Circular Quay, The Rocks and Sydney Harbour Bridge -the Walsh Bay Precinct is said to be "the most significant urban renewal of heritage Sydney to be undertaken for many years."

According to developers Walsh Bay Partnership (WBP), a joint venture project between Mirvac and Transfield, "the redevelopment captures an exceptional balance between Walsh Bay's rich heritage, sympathetic contemporary design, and the vision to revitalise Walsh Bay as Australia's finest new residential address."

The development features 350 luxury apartments, 140 of them located on Pier 6f7, one of the five "finger wharves" constructed between 1906 and 1922 to serve Sydney's expanding commercial shipping activity. But the area's history goes back much further: Walsh Bay was one of Sydney's first industrial ports, dating back to 1820. Like many other city ports around the world, Walsh Bay ceased operations in the '70s and by the late '90s much of the area was unused and neglected.


New Technology Preserves Authentic Feel
WBP was formed in '97 to undertake restoration, with an emphasis on conservation strategies such as salvaging the old hardwood timbers and historical artefacts. Over 80% of the original buildings are being retained and the style of new construction is required to evoke and interpret Walsh Bay's rich heritage. Preserving its historic appeal, unique operable louvres which mimic the original timber planks face the 200m long refurbished pier. These are made from aluminium and supported by grade 316 stainless steel brackets. The louvres pivot on stainless steel supports, allowing them to withstand winds up to 130krnlh. As a safety measure, they close automatically if the weather worsens. They were designed by Architectural Glass Projects Pty Ltd, a Sydney firm which specialises in building components such as glass facades, operable louvres, balustrading and specialised glazing.

 

Stainless to Resist Sea Spray
To take best advantage of its Sydney Harbour location, a marina with private boat moorings accessible from ground-level apartments runs along both sides of the pier and features     stainless steel steps, gates and balustrades.

Starting with the right materials and selecting the most appropriate surface finish are key factors for ensuring the quality and life-cycle of the finished project, particularly in harsh marine environments. A surface roughness (Ra) under O.SJ.Jm using 320 grit abrasives was specified for the stainless steel used in this project. Mechanical grinding was followed by electropolishing, a chemical process which smooths and levels the surface, to produce the best protection against tea staining and contamination.

Surface treatments were carried out by two ASSDA members, MME Surface Finishing and Metaglo Pty Ltd. A large proportion of the stainless steel material used was imported large extruded T and 'L' sections up to 150mm deep. MME, which has the capacity to process elements up to 6.5m long by either mechanical means or electropolishing, modified machines and developed new techniques to produce a consistent O.SJ.Jm finish throughout. Components were returned to MME after fabrication for immersion pickling and electropolishing.

An Asset for Sydney
The revitalised Walsh Bay precinct is set to become an attraction for residents and visitors when it opens next year. As well as offices and apartments, the development includes a new cultural centre, an 850 seat theatre, parks, restored bridges and walkways. A promenade will link Walsh Bay to The Rocks and Circular Quay, opening up the foreshore to the public for the first time in over a century.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 23, December 2002.

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